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I have a remote sql connection in C# that needs to execute a query and save its results to the users's local hard disk. There is a fairly large amount of data this thing can return, so need to think of an efficient way of storing it. I've read before that first putting the whole result into memory and then writing it is not a good idea, so if someone could help, would be great!

I am currently storing the sql result data into a DataTable, although I am thinking it could be better doing something in while(myReader.Read(){...} Below is the code that gets the results:

          DataTable t = new DataTable();
            string myQuery = QueryLoader.ReadQueryFromFileWithBdateEdate(@"Resources\qrs\qryssysblo.q", newdate, newdate);
            using (SqlDataAdapter a = new SqlDataAdapter(myQuery, sqlconn.myConnection))
            {
                a.Fill(t);
            }

            var result = string.Empty;
    for(int i = 0; i < t.Rows.Count; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < t.Columns.Count; j++)
        {
            result += t.Rows[i][j] + ",";
        }


        result += "\r\n";
    }

So now I have this huge result string. And I have the datatable. There has to be a much better way of doing it?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/2244655/… – Dennis Traub Jan 29 '12 at 18:21
    
Are you just writing to an unformatted flat file, or would it be better to put the data into columns such as a .csv spreadsheet? – DOK Jan 29 '12 at 18:23
    
flat comma-del file. – Sam Jan 29 '12 at 18:24
up vote 13 down vote accepted

You are on the right track yourself. Use a loop with while(myReader.Read(){...} and write each record to the text file inside the loop. The .NET framework and operating system will take care of flushing the buffers to disk in an efficient way.

using(SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
using(SqlCommand cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
{
  conn.Open();
  cmd.CommandText = QueryLoader.ReadQueryFromFileWithBdateEdate(
    @"Resources\qrs\qryssysblo.q", newdate, newdate);

  using(SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
  using(StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter("c:\temp\file.txt"))
  {
    while(reader.Read())
    {
      // Using Name and Phone as example columns.
      writer.WriteLine("Name: {0}, Phone : {1}", 
        reader["Name"], reader["Phone"]);
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. which writing method should I use? streamwriter? IO? an example would be very helpful. thanks – Sam Jan 29 '12 at 18:22
    
Use a StreamWriter if you want to write to a file. See my update with an example. – Anders Abel Jan 29 '12 at 18:27
    
Thanks. For all rows I am using: StringBuilder row = new StringBuilder(); for(int i = 0; i < myReader.FieldCount; i++){ row.Append(myReader[i]); if(i!= myReader.FieldCount -1 ) row.Append("\t"); } writer.WriteLine(row); – Sam Jan 29 '12 at 18:42
    
You are missing a closing parentheses on line 9. Tried to edit, but it's less than 6 characters. – StevenWhite Jul 9 '14 at 18:48
    
@StevenWhite Thanks. Fixed. – Anders Abel Jul 9 '14 at 18:51

I agree that your best bet here would be to use a SqlDataReader. Something like this:

StreamWriter YourWriter = new StreamWriter(@"c:\testfile.txt");
SqlCommand YourCommand = new SqlCommand();
SqlConnection YourConnection = new SqlConnection(YourConnectionString);
YourCommand.Connection = YourConnection;
YourCommand.CommandText = myQuery;

YourConnection.Open();

using (YourConnection)
{
    using (SqlDataReader sdr = YourCommand.ExecuteReader())
        using (YourWriter)
        {
            while (sdr.Read())
                YourWriter.WriteLine(sdr[0].ToString() + sdr[1].ToString() + ",");

        }
}

Mind you, in the while loop, you can write that line to the text file in any format you see fit with the column data from the SqlDataReader.

share|improve this answer

I came up with this, it's a better CSV writer than the other answers:

public static class DataReaderExtension
{
    public static void ToCsv(this IDataReader dataReader, string fileName, bool includeHeaderAsFirstRow)
    {

        const string Separator = ",";

        StreamWriter streamWriter = new StreamWriter(fileName);

        StringBuilder sb = null;

        if (includeHeaderAsFirstRow)
        {
            sb = new StringBuilder();
            for (int index = 0; index < dataReader.FieldCount; index++)
            {
                if (dataReader.GetName(index) != null)
                    sb.Append(dataReader.GetName(index));

                if (index < dataReader.FieldCount - 1)
                    sb.Append(Separator);
            }
            streamWriter.WriteLine(sb.ToString());
        }

        while (dataReader.Read())
        {
            sb = new StringBuilder();
            for (int index = 0; index < dataReader.FieldCount - 1; index++)
            {
                if (!dataReader.IsDBNull(index))
                {
                    string value = dataReader.GetValue(index).ToString();
                    if (dataReader.GetFieldType(index) == typeof(String))
                    {
                        if (value.IndexOf("\"") >= 0)
                            value = value.Replace("\"", "\"\"");

                        if (value.IndexOf(Separator) >= 0)
                            value = "\"" + value + "\"";
                    }
                    sb.Append(value);
                }

                if (index < dataReader.FieldCount - 1)
                    sb.Append(Separator);
            }

            if (!dataReader.IsDBNull(dataReader.FieldCount - 1))
                sb.Append(dataReader.GetValue(dataReader.FieldCount - 1).ToString().Replace(Separator, " "));

            streamWriter.WriteLine(sb.ToString());
        }
        dataReader.Close();
        streamWriter.Close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Rob Sedgwick answer is more like it, but can be improved and simplified. This is how I did it:

string separator = ";";
string fieldDelimiter = "";
bool useHeaders = true;

string connectionString = "xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx";

using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
     using (SqlCommand cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
     {
          conn.Open();
          string query = @"SELECT whatever";

          cmd.CommandText = query;

          using (SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
          {
                if (!reader.Read())
                {
                     return;
                }

                List<string> columnNames = GetColumnNames(reader);

                // Write headers if required
                if (useHeaders)
                {
                     first = true;
                     foreach (string columnName in columnNames)
                     {
                          response.Write(first ? string.Empty : separator);
                          line = string.Format("{0}{1}{2}", fieldDelimiter, columnName, fieldDelimiter);
                          response.Write(line);
                          first = false;
                     }

                     response.Write("\n");
                }

                // Write all records
                do
                {
                     first = true;
                     foreach (string columnName in columnNames)
                     {
                          response.Write(first ? string.Empty : separator);
                          string value = reader[columnName] == null ? string.Empty : reader[columnName].ToString();
                          line = string.Format("{0}{1}{2}", fieldDelimiter, value, fieldDelimiter);
                          response.Write(line);
                          first = false;
                     }

                     response.Write("\n");
                }
                while (reader.Read());
          }
     }
}

And you need to have a function GetColumnNames:

List<string> GetColumnNames(IDataReader reader)
{
    List<string> columnNames = new List<string>();
    for (int i = 0; i < reader.FieldCount; i++)
    {
         columnNames.Add(reader.GetName(i));
    }

    return columnNames;
}
share|improve this answer

Using the response object without a response.Close() causes at least in some instances the html of the page writing out the data to be written to the file. If you use Response.Close() the connection can be closed prematurely and cause an error producing the file.

It is recommended to use the HttpApplication.CompleteRequest() however this appears to always cause the html to be written to the end of the file.

I have tried the stream in conjunction with the response object and have had success in the development environment. I have not tried it in production yet.

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