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I am working on making my own custom CMS in PHP by hand and I have a few constants I have defined. Is there an easy way to modify the constants? I was thinking about using something like fopen() then changing it, but I have never used the filesystem functions.

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You may want to revisit the dictionary definition of "constant". –  BoltClock Jan 29 '12 at 19:22
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constants and fopen? –  Book Of Zeus Jan 29 '12 at 19:22
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Why do you need to change your constants? If they aren't constant through out your code, use variables –  Tom Jan 29 '12 at 19:23
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Constants ARE constants - you can not modify them. If, of course, you are talking about define('constant_name', 'constant_value'); Otherwise explain on example, because it looks like you are trying to talk about changing configuration parameters of CMS in its config file, rewriting it with php script. –  Cheery Jan 29 '12 at 19:23
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I know what constant's mean. I just want to know if there is a way I could change them, or something similar. I don't want to have to keep manually editing them through the php file. I am sorry that I am thinking of the wrong thing. –  legobear154 Jan 29 '12 at 19:24
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8 Answers 8

up vote 25 down vote accepted

A constant is an identifier (name) for a simple value. As the name suggests, that value cannot change during the execution of the script (except for magic constants, which aren't actually constants). A constant is case-sensitive by default. By convention, constant identifiers are always uppercase.

The name of a constant follows the same rules as any label in PHP. A valid constant name starts with a letter or underscore, followed by any number of letters, numbers, or underscores. As a regular expression, it would be expressed thusly: [a-zA-Z_\x7f-\xff][a-zA-Z0-9_\x7f-\xff]*

from: http://php.net/manual/en/language.constants.php

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cant say better than the php.net page! –  Tech4Wilco Feb 5 '12 at 0:07
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Constants are constants and therefore cannot be changed. If you want to change the server constants such as allow_url_fopen, that is the host's reponsibility, ask them. If you want to change them in PHP, use variables

UPDATE

In case the truth is what Corbin says and you want to modify them in installation, you would want to do the following: 0. Change constant values to sg. like %%constant1. 1. read the code into a variable. 2. Let the user set the variables. 3. Use str_replace on all of them like str_replace("%%constant1",$_POST["value1"],$configfile). 4. Put $configfile as a content of a file.

UPDATE 2

For your own CMS only, I suggest the following: store all constants in one file, so you will need to edit one file only. And perhaps than the previous solution could work for an easier editing, but IDK if it is worth the time.

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No. They're constants, as in "constant - that which is permanent or invariable" (Wiktionary). Once they're defined, there is no way to change them. To quote The Fine Manual, section Constants:

[a constant's] value cannot change during the execution of the script.

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I am sorry for being incorrect... to me constants are just a value that can be used throughout an entire site without having to keep defining them. I should have been more clear what I was trying to achieve. I am creating my own CMS for my own use only and I was wondering how I could go about creating a way to change variables or whatever a good term for them would be without manually editing the file/files that contain them. I am sorry. –  legobear154 Jan 29 '12 at 19:29
    
No need to apologize for being incorrect, it happens to everyone :) –  Piskvor Jan 29 '12 at 19:32
    
Ok. What would the best way to create a config file be? I am going to add an admin panel to my CMS and I want the variables to be editable from there. –  legobear154 Jan 29 '12 at 19:33
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No. you can not modify constants

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in PHP, but only if you have the runkit extension installed.

However, I must question why you're even defining a constant if you need to change it.  It would no longer be a constant once changed and it's appropriate to use constants in your context if it needs to be changed.  You may want to consider making it a global variable if it needs to be accessible in other functions or parts of your code, or write proper code by:
Passing the data as parameters to a function, then returning the manipulated values (if coding in a procedural fashion).
Set the value in a class' property, then access the value using $this within your class (if coding in an OO fashion).
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As far as I know, once set, a constant cannot be changed.

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Constants means the value is constant, so you cannot change constants. If you will change the constants you need to use variables in state of constants:

define('ROOT', '/some/path');
echo ROOT; // echo's /some/path
define('ROOT', '/some/other/path'); // gives an error
echo ROOT; // gives /some/path (if there were no error

$root = '/some/path';
echo $root; // echo's /some/path
$root = '/some/other/path';
echo $root; // echo's /some/other/path
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I think he means in the case of an installer script, where he want to store an input variable to a config file, to be used in his CMS, once the install is complete. In that case hes not changing the constant at runtime.

hes probably got a file like this:

define(DB, '');
define(USER, '');
define(PASS, '');
define(HOST, '');

And he wants to create a script that populate these constants with data so it can be used in the CMS.

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