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I installed the Maven plugin for Eclipse, and then I got an error like below:

please make sure the -vm option in eclipse.ini is pointing to a JDK

How do I use the -vm option to point to my JDK in eclipse.ini?

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1  
wiki.eclipse.org/Eclipse.ini –  Paul Verest Nov 11 '14 at 5:09

14 Answers 14

up vote 80 down vote accepted

My solution is:

-vm
D:/work/Java/jdk1.6.0_13/bin/javaw.exe
-showsplash
org.eclipse.platform
--launcher.XXMaxPermSize
256M
-framework
plugins\org.eclipse.osgi_3.4.3.R34x_v20081215-1030.jar
-vmargs
-Dosgi.requiredJavaVersion=1.5
-Xms40m
-Xmx512m
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See also stackoverflow.com/questions/142357/… –  VonC May 25 '09 at 8:22
    
On Unix systems use java instead of javaw.exe –  jeremyjjbrown Nov 8 '13 at 3:55

Anything after the "vmargs" is taken to be vm arguments. Just make sure it's before that, which is the last piece in eclipse.ini.

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3  
Yes very important detail! –  Patrick Wolf Sep 16 '10 at 9:55
    
Thanks for mentioning that. –  Martin Sep 16 '10 at 15:01
    
This is the missing bit of information as well as not putting -vm and the path on the same line –  amrcus Jun 10 '14 at 2:37
    
Also one other thing to note, do not open the ini file in notepad as it will display incorrectly. Open it in another editor, e.g. notepad++ –  amrcus Jun 10 '14 at 2:55

eclipse.ini file must have -vm on the first line and a path on the second line. Don't try to put everything into one line!

-vm
C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.6.0_07\bin\javaw.exe
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5  
this answer saved at least one hour –  oguza1b Jun 26 '11 at 16:25
2  
Thanks for the "onel line" trick. -vm "C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.6.0_07\bin\javaw.exe" on one line does not work. –  rds Aug 8 '11 at 9:17

There is a wiki page here.

There are two ways the JVM can be started: by forking it in a separate process from the Eclipse launcher, or by loading it in-process using the JNI invocation API.

If you specify -vm with a path to the actual java(w).exe, then the JVM will be forked in a separate process. You can also specify -vm with a path to the jvm.dll so that the JVM is loaded in the same process:

-vm
D:/work/Java/jdk1.6.0_13/jre/bin/client/jvm.dll

You can also specify the path to the jre/bin folder itself.

Note also, the general format of the eclipse.ini is each argument on a separate line. It won't work if you put the "-vm" and the path on the same line.

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-vm

C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.5.0_06\bin\javaw.exe

Remember, no quotes, no matter if your path has spaces (as opposed to command line execution).

See here: Find the JRE for Eclipse

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I am not sure if something has changed, but I just tried the other answers regarding entries in "eclipse.ini" for Eclipse Galileo SR2 (Windows XP SR3) and none worked. Java is jdk1.6.0_18 and is the default Windows install. Things improved when I dropped "\javaw.exe" from the path.

Also, I can't thank enough the mention that -vm needs to be first line in the ini file. I believe that really helped me out.

Thus my eclipse.ini file starts with:

-vm
C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.6.0_18\bin

FYI, my particular need to specify launching Eclipse with a JDK arose from my wanting to work with the m2eclipse plugin.

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You have to edit the eclipse.ini file to have an entry similar to this:

C:\Java\JDK\1.5\bin\javaw.exe (your location of java executable)
-vmargs
-Xms64m   (based on you memory requirements)
-Xmx1028m

Also remember that in eclipse.ini, anything meant for Eclipse should be before the -vmargs line and anything for JVM should be after the -vmargs line.

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The JDK you're pointing to in your eclipse.ini has to match the Eclipse installation.

If you are running a 32- or 64-bit Eclipse, use a 32 or 64-bit Java JDK, respectively.

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My solution for Ubuntu Linux:

-vm
/home/daniel/Downloads/jdk1.6.0_17/bin
-startup
plugins/org.eclipse.equinox.launcher_1.1.1.R36x_v20101122_1400.jar
--launcher.library
plugins/org.eclipse.equinox.launcher.gtk.linux.x86_64_1.1.2.R36x_v20101019_1345
-product
org.eclipse.epp.package.jee.product
--launcher.defaultAction
openFile
-showsplash
org.eclipse.platform
--launcher.XXMaxPermSize
256m
--launcher.defaultAction
openFile
-vmargs
-Dosgi.requiredJavaVersion=1.5
-XX:MaxPermSize=256m
-Xms40m
-Xmx512m
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Assuming you have a jre folder, which contains bin, lib, etc files copied from a Java Runtime distribution, in the same folder as eclipse.ini, you can set in your eclilpse.ini

-vm
jre\bin\javaw.exe
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Don't use the -vm tweak in eclipse.ini.

Eclipse will use the JAVA_HOME environment variable if set. This is the standard way to tell a Java app where to find the JDK/Java runtime.

Make sure you set JAVA_HOME to a valid JDK path (don't include the bin folder), and you won't need to tweak your eclipse.ini.

Google setting+environment+variables prepending your OS, if you don't know how to define a system/user variable.

The -vm option in eclipse.ini is the last resort and should only be used if for some reason you cannot set your JAVA_HOME.

The only case when it would make sense editing eclipse.ini is when you need to adjust VM parameters, e.g. -XmsNNN, -XmxNNN -XX:PermSize=NNN, etc for Eclipse itself. It should not be used for defining runtime parameters for the projects you start inside Eclipse - VM options for projects are defined in launcher configurations.

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No, eclipse.ini is not "the last resort". Vice a versa it is a preferable way to specify JVM: "One of the most recommended options to use is to specify a specific JVM for Eclipse to run on. Doing this ensures that you are absolutely certain which JVM Eclipse will run in and insulates you from system changes that can alter the "default" JVM for your system. Many a user has been tripped up because they thought they knew what JVM would be used by default, but they thought wrong. eclipse.ini lets you be CERTAIN." See wiki.eclipse.org/Eclipse.ini#Specifying_the_JVM –  mies Jun 7 at 18:46
    
@mies: the point is to have an environment where you can run an app such as Eclipse, or any other java app out-of-the-box without having to tweak anything. A lot of apps rely on having JAVA_HOME defined, and using eclipse.ini to explicitly set the JVM makes sense when you want to override the default JVM. –  ccpizza Jun 20 at 11:28

I'd like to share this little hack:

A click on the Eclipse's icon indicated a problem with the JRE. So, I put this command in the destination field of the icon's properties:

C:\...\eclipse.exe -vm c:\'Program Files'\Java\jdk1.7.0_51\jre\bin\javaw

Thinking that the "'" would solve the problem with the space in the path. That did not function. Then, I tried this command:

C:\...\eclipse.exe -vm c:\Progra~1\Java\jdk1.7.0_51\jre\bin\javaw

with success

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I know that there exists a command line option, -vm, to specify the path to the executable of the Java runtime. This may be the same as in eclipse.ini.

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Details here: http://wiki.eclipse.org/Eclipse.ini#Specifying_the_JVM. Make sure -vm is on the first line of eclipse.ini and path on the second.

Specifying -vm parameter in eclipse.ini file will guarantee that eclipse will use that vm on startup.

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