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i=n;
while(i>=1){
    j=i;  

    while(j<=n){ 
        thetha(1)
        j=j*2;
    }
    i=i/2;
}

Edit : changed the code because of op's comment below.

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2 Answers 2

Yes, you are correct in that the outer loop is Log(n) and the inner loop is Log(n), which yields (log n)(log n).

The reason for Log(n) complexity is because the number of remaining iterations in the loop is halved at each iteration. Whether this is achieved by dividing the iterating variable i by 2 or by multiplying the variable j by 2 is irrelevant. The time taken to complete the loops grows as Log(n) for each loop.

The multiplication of (log n)(log n) is due to the fact that each iteration of the outer loop executes Log(n) iterations of the inner loop.

The additions are unnecessary because in big-O notation we are only concerned with the rate at which a function grows relative to another function. Offsetting it by a constant (or multiplying by a constant) does not change the relative complexity of the functions, so the end result is (log n)(log n).

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In the while(i>=1){ (...) } loop, i is bigger than 1 (stricly bigger except for the last iteration). Thus, after j=i, j is bigger than 1 (stricly bigger except for the last iteration).

For that reason, your code is more or less equivalent to :

i=n;
while(i>1){
    i=i/2;
}
if (i==1){
    j=i
    while(j<=1){ 
        thetha(1)
        j=j*2;
    }
}

Which can be rewritten :

i=n;
while(i>1){
    i=i/2;
}
if (i==1){
    thetha(1)
}

And the overall complexity is the complexity of the while loop which is log(n).

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i am sorry.. it is not while(j<=1), it is while(j<=n) –  user1174727 Jan 29 '12 at 23:48

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