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If there is something more difficult than debugging a multithreaded app that is trying to describe the bug itself.

  • I have two boost::threads (application and display).
  • Both use the same asio::io_service to do their work. The display thread has a std::set of type window* which is a class I use to wrap winapi window management.
  • I use a custom message queue to communicate these two threads.
  • One of these messages (terminate) is used to notify the display thread that it must not "post" any more methods and that it must call thread_group.remove_thread and remove itself.
  • The thread has a variable (state) that flags the state of the thread (running, paused, terminated).
  • If it is running it "posts" it's update() method that iterates an std::set and calls the update method in each window* it contains.
  • If it is terminated, it clears the std::set, removes itself from the thread_group and doesn't post any more work.

The problem: Once a while, when trying to close the app, the thread's update method gets ran after the thread got "terminated" and the std::set got cleared. Then the update method tries to iterate the std::set and a SIGSEGV takes place. This only happens 1 every 10 runs of the application and I'm having a hard time trying to guess what's wrong.

I'll try to post the relevant code, if more is needed I'll try to add it.

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    boost::asio::io_service ios;
    boost::asio::strand     strand(ios);
    boost::thread_group     threads;
    owl::system::pump       pump;

    application app(&threads, &strand, &pump);
    owl::system::display display(&strand, &pump);

    ios.run();
    threads.join_all();

    return 0;
}
...
void display::on_terminate()
{
    close_all_windows();
}
...
void display::close_all_windows()
{
    windows.move_first();
    while (!windows.eof())
    {
        window* win = windows.value();
        win->destroy();
        delete win;
        windows.move_next();
    }
    windows.clear();
    check_no_window();
}
...
void display::on_update()
{
    if (windows.size())
    {
        windows.move_first();
        while (!windows.eof())
        {
            windows.value()->update();
            windows.move_next(); // Here happens the SIGSEGV
        }
    }
}

The class display inherits the class subsystem that manages thread execution. This is the relevant code involving the execution of on_update()

void subsystem::do_update()
{
    message* msg;

    size_t message_count = messages.size();
    for (size_t i=0; i<message_count; i++)
    {
        msg = messages[i];
        process_message(msg);
        strand->dispatch(strand->wrap(boost::bind(&message::deallocate, msg)));
    }

    switch (state)
    {
        case running:
        {
            on_update();
        }
        break;
        case paused:
        {
            // Do not update. Just check the queue and sleep
            sleep(10);
        }
        break;
        case terminated:
        {
            do_terminate();
            return;
        }
        break;
    }
        strand->post(strand->wrap(boost::bind(&subsystem::check_for_messages, this)));
}

void subsystem::check_for_messages()
{
        messages.clear();
    pump->get_messages(this, messages);
    ios->post(boost::bind(&subsystem::do_update, this));
}

The SIGSEGV occurs exactly when trying to increment the std::set iterator.

Child process PID: 2272
Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
In std::_Rb_tree_increment(std::_Rb_tree_node_base const*) ()
stl_tree.h:269
share|improve this question
    
What triggers execution of the update method? –  Lou Jan 30 '12 at 1:32
    
The call to io_service::post that appears in the the method check_for_messages(). I managed to solve this a few hours after I posted this question. I went back to mutexes and rearranged the code to only use one method for the thread loop using io_service::post. At first I thought strand would be a neat way to avoid using mutexes explicitly but it appears that its behavior isn't 100% predictable or I'm not using it 100% correctly. –  damian Jan 30 '12 at 10:48
1  
You should probably post your solution and then mark it as answered. –  Lou Jan 30 '12 at 15:09
    
The solution was to discard asio::strand completely and keep the io_service loop simple, posting just one method. On Windows 7 there seems to be some issues with window messaging and threading. That was solved by making the threads that share the queue sleep 1 millisecond each iteration. Also someone in other question around here said that when you do while(PeekMessage()) Translate/Dispatch, you must call PeekMessage with NOREMOVE as a last parameter for vista compatibility but I haven't confirmed that helped on my case. –  damian Jan 30 '12 at 21:36
    
Related to my last comment: Actually, to avoid threads getting ghosted on windows 7 I found out that calling PeekMessage from EACH thread solves the problem. –  damian Feb 26 '12 at 18:36

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