Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Web server running in Dutch(Belgium)

double output;

double.TryParse(txtTextbox1.Text, out output);

Is this a good way to convert text to double in dutch environment? Let's say the input is "24.45" instead of "24,45"

share|improve this question
    
Argh, now I have this song stuck in my head: youtube.com/watch?v=Rt6Co7EMNCU –  Daniel Earwicker May 25 '09 at 7:58
    
Thanks Matthew Brindley –  Ervin Ter May 25 '09 at 8:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 24 down vote accepted

If you want to use the Dutch (Belgium) number format:

double output;
double.TryParse("24,45", NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("nl-BE"), out output);

Or to use the US number format:

double output;
double.TryParse("24.45", NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("en-US"), out output);

If you attempt to parse "24.45" with a Dutch culture set, you'll get back "2445", similarly, if you attempt to parse "24,45" with a US culture, you'll get "2445". If you want the parse to fail if the wrong decimal point is used, change NumberStyles.Any to exclude the flag: NumberStyles.AllowThousands:

double output;
if (double.TryParse("24.45", NumberStyles.Any ^ NumberStyles.AllowThousands, CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("nl-BE"), out output))

If your entire application is in Dutch, you should change your cultureinfo globally - here's how to do it in WinForms and here's how to do it in ASP.NET.

Once you're using a globally set CultureInfo, you can change the above code to:

double output;
double.TryParse("24.45", NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, out output);
share|improve this answer
    
If I set CultureInfo globally, double.TryParse("24.45", out output) will performing same like double.TryParse("24.45", NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, out output) ? –  Ervin Ter May 25 '09 at 8:34
    
Very nice answer! –  Cerebrus May 25 '09 at 8:54

The correct Culture Code for dutch-Belgium is "nl-BE", so you should use that instead of the often suggested "nl-NL", which would give you the variant of Dutch culture settings appropriate for the Netherlands.

double output;
double.TryParse("24.45", NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("nl-BE"), out output);

You can find a complete list of Culture Codes at http://arvindlounge.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!C9061D5B358A2804!263.entry .

share|improve this answer

You should set the culture to Dutch. The culture is what determines how strings representing numbers are parsed.

Check this article: HOW TO: Set Current Culture Programmatically in an ASP.NET Application, it explains both how to set the culture for the ASP.NET application and for the current thread.

share|improve this answer

If your server's regional settings are set to Dutch numbers, try this:

double output;
double.TryParse(txtTextbox1.Text, System.Globalization.NumberStyles.Any, System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, out output);
share|improve this answer

You can use the overload that allows you to specify locale (sample with Swedish locale, since I know how that one works):

double result;
if (double.TryParse("24,95", NumberStyles.AllowDecimalPoint, CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("sv-SE"), out result))
{
    Console.WriteLine(result.ToString());
}

If I would pass "24.95" in the above call to TryParse it would return false, since the Swedish decimal sign is ",".

You may want to experiment with the NumberStyles parameter to get the exact behaviour that you want. For instance, if I would change to NumberStyles.Any and call the method with the input 24.95 above, TryParse returns true and the result will be 2495, which might not be what you want.

share|improve this answer

My version works fine with both separators '.' and ',':

public static double? GetDoubleFromString(string strNum)
        {
            double num = 0;
            strNum = strNum.Replace(',', '.');

            if (double.TryParse(strNum, NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("en-US"), out num))
                return num;

            return null;
        }
share|improve this answer
1  
This would not work very well with numbers such as 1,234,567.89 or 1.234.567,89 –  phoog Oct 1 '12 at 16:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.