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I'm trying to figure a solution out to the following. I have the following HTML:

<div style="width:50em; height:10em">
    <span class='rating-5 rating-span'>
        <span class='rating-4 rating-span'>
            <span class='rating-3 rating-span'>
                <span class='rating-2 rating-span'>
                    <span class='rating-1 rating-span'>
                        <div class='rating-star unselected'></div>
                    </span>
                    <div class='rating-star unselected'></div>
                </span>
                <div class='rating-star unselected'></div>
             </span>
             <div class='rating-star unselected'></div>
         </span>
         <div class='rating-star unselected'></div>
     </span>
</div>

and the following CSS:

div.rating-star{
    display:inline-block;
    width:20%;
    height:100%;
    /*border:solid thin black;*/
    padding:0px;
    margin:0px;
}

div.rating-star.unselected {
    background-image: url(star.jpg);   
    background-size: contain;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
}

.rating-span:hover div.rating-star {
    background-image: url(hover.jpg);   
    background-size: contain;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
}

The idea is that, if you hover over a star, all the stars from the left will light up. However, what actually happens is that all of the stars light up, wherever you hover.

Now it's clear to me that this is because my :hover selector is selecting the outermost span. My question is this: in the case of the :hover selector, there is a determination of which element is being hovered over. In the case where that element contains other elements (of the same type), is there a way to stipulate which element should be selected. In this case it would be the lowest possible one.

I appreciate that I could do this quite simply with Javascript; I'm just hoping that there's a pure CSS solution to it.

UPDATE Here's a JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/MkJmj/1/ It's slightly modified to use absolute urls to the images, but otherwise identical

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1  
This would be great to solve with CSS alone. +1 for an interesting question. –  Bojangles Jan 29 '12 at 23:15
    
Can you provide a JS Fiddle? I think I have an idea, but I'm not sure until I can test it (and I can't be bothered to go looking for star icons to test with). –  David Thomas Jan 29 '12 at 23:18
    
Unrelated to your question, but it's not valid to nest divs inside spans - you may as well turn everything into span instead. –  BoltClock Jan 29 '12 at 23:25
1  
Not posting this as an answer, just something you might like to look into: htmldrive.net/items/show/689/Pure-CSS-Star-Rating-System I think this solution is much cleaner than what you are attempting to do. –  Strelok Jan 29 '12 at 23:25
    
If highlighting right to left rather than left to right, it would be easy and clean, using something like .rating-star:hover, .rating-star:hover ~ .rating-star and dropping the unseemly nested stuff. Unfortunately there's no "sibling preceeded by" selector, and unlikely to ever be one. –  JimmiTh Jan 29 '12 at 23:31
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A Pure CSS Solution

jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/alecgorge/Sw5Ym/

This is a pure CSS solution. I would recommend changing the HTML, but this was a fun exercise. Here is what I changed:

div.rating-star{
    display:inline-block;

...

.rating-span:hover div.rating-star {

to

div.rating-star{
    display:block;
    float:right;

...

.rating-span:hover > div.rating-star {

A better solution

By changing the div's to span's you have valid HTML (although a bit messy), and you can have a fully IE 7+ compatible solution: http://jsfiddle.net/alecgorge/FEHuw/

Make sure you resize the window to show all the stars on one line. Once the star image is smaller, the span's can be smaller and things will work better.

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Thanks for that solution; I'll need to change my invalid HTML anyway, so I guess I won't end up using this one... but kudos for finding a solution! –  Dancrumb Jan 29 '12 at 23:57
    
check my update –  Alec Gorge Jan 30 '12 at 0:05
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I've simplified your HTML, since it was both invalid and unwieldy (not to mention difficult to target easily with CSS selectors). And, with that modified HTML, the CSS (below) seems to work as you want. Though it's tested only in Chromium 14, older browsers will almost certainly not quite work. Nor Internet Explorer (at all, at a guess):

HTML:

<div>
    <div class='rating-star unselected'></div>
    <div class='rating-star unselected'></div>
    <div class='rating-star unselected'></div>
    <div class='rating-star unselected'></div>
    <div class='rating-star unselected'></div>
</div>

And the CSS:

div:hover div.rating-star:hover ~ div.rating-star {
    background-image: url(http://danrumney.co.uk/images/star.jpg);   
    background-size: contain;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
}

JS Fiddle.

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That's a delightful solution. Turns out that MSIE doesn't like the background-size at all, so I may be on a hiding to nothing. However, I really like this solution... very neat. –  Dancrumb Jan 29 '12 at 23:56
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