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I'm downloading a video using the below code and maintaining a progress bar to show how much of the download has been completed.

ByteArrayBuffer baf = new ByteArrayBuffer((int)filesize);
long current = 0;
long notificationSize = filesize / 100 * 5;
int notifyCount = 0;
while ((current = inStream.read()) != -1)
{
    baf.append((byte) current);
    count += current;

    //only process update once for each kb
    if(count > notificationSize * notifyCount)
    {
        notifier.processUpdate(count);
        notifyCount++;;
    }

}

The issue i'm running into is the data being returned from the input stream adds up to be more than the file size. Meaning my progress bar completes before the download completes.

For example i'm download a video that has a file size of 1,849,655 bytes, but the count of the download adds to 228,932,955.

Android Progress bars use a percentage of how much of the process is complete. How do i know how much is complete if the total byte count from the download is more than the size of the file.

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How are you assigning the value of filesize? –  Will Kru Jan 29 '12 at 23:47
    
I'm doing it two ways to ensure i'm getting the right size. The size is in an RSS feed where i'm getting the file location from. I'm also using getContentLength from a URLConnection instance. both return the same filesize which matches the file size once downloaded –  Stimsoni Jan 29 '12 at 23:50
    
Found the solution. It was because read() only reads a byte at a time, but returns the number of bytes read being more then one. I will post the full solution later as i don't have permission to answer my own question this quickly yet. –  Stimsoni Jan 30 '12 at 1:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Worked out the issue.

When downloading and keeping track of the amount of data that has been downloaded do not use read() from the BufferedInputStream.

Instead use read(buffer, offset, length);

I also changed my code to write out the data to a file as i go instead of storing the data in memory and outputting once all data has come down.

byte[] baf = new byte[filesize];
int actual = 0;
int count = 0;
long notificationSize = filesize / 100 * 5;
int notifyCount = 0;
while (actual != -1)
{
    //write data to file
    fos.write(baf, 0, actual);
    count += actual;

    //only process update once for each kb
    if(count > notificationSize * notifyCount)
    {
        notifier.processUpdate(count);
        notifyCount++;;
    }
    actual = inStream.read(baf, 0, filesize);
}

I'm not really sure why read() shows it has read multiple bytes when read() is only meant to read a byte at a time.

If you really want to use read() change

count += current;

to

count++;

It's a rather inefficient way to download though as the number of loops in the while loop is much greater. After some brief performance testing seems slower to download as well (as it needs to write out to the file for each byte instead of a chunk of bytes).

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