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I was trying to copy files from FTP using FTPWebRequest in my wcf block here is the code below.

  long cl = response.ContentLength;
                int bufferSize = 4155;
                int readCount=0;
                int i = 0;
                byte[] newbuffer;
                byte[] buffer = new byte[bufferSize];

                //Follow the Using here
                using (Stream input = response.GetResponseStream())
                {
                    readCount = input.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
                    if (readCount > 0)
                    {
                        newbuffer = new byte[readCount];
                        Array.Copy(buffer, newbuffer, readCount);
                        outputStream.Write(newbuffer.ToArray(), 0, readCount);


                    }
                    outputStream.Close();
                }

               ftpStream.Close();

                response.Close();

            }

in the "USING" block was suggested by "DotNetUser" member,i found one thing in the code outputStream.Write(newbuffer.ToArray(), 0, readCount); throwing an exception at "ToArray",it suppose to be like outputStream.Write(newbuffer, 0, readCount);please suggest me.

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Array doesn't implement IEnumerable<T> which is the type the ToArray method extends. newbuffer is already an Array type why would you need to convert it? –  M.Babcock Jan 30 '12 at 1:53
1  
You wrote your own answer at the end of your question. Did you try this and did it work for you? If not, what error are you given? –  Trevor Elliott Jan 30 '12 at 1:53
    
@M.Babcock: Where did you get the false idea that arrays don't implement IEnumerable<T>? From the specification: "In the .NET Framework version 2.0, the Array class implements the System.Collections.Generic.IList<T>, System.Collections.Generic.ICollection<T>, and System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<T> generic interfaces." Of course, your second point is correct. –  jason Jan 30 '12 at 1:56
    
@Jason - According to the MSDN documentation for Array, it only implements ICloneable, IList, ICollection, IEnumerable, IStructuralComparable, IStructuralEquatable. None of the interfaces you listed are included. Have I misunderstood the documentation? –  M.Babcock Jan 30 '12 at 1:59
    
@M.Babcock: The Remarks section of that same documentation page says: "...the Array class implements the IList<T>, ICollection<T>, and IEnumerable<T> generic interfaces. The implementations are provided to arrays at run time, and therefore are not visible to the documentation build tools. As a result, the generic interfaces do not appear in the declaration syntax for the Array class, and there are no reference topics for interface members that are accessible only by casting an array to the generic interface type (explicit interface implementations)." –  LukeH Jan 30 '12 at 2:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The newbuffer variable is already an array, so you don't need to convert it to an array. You can just use:

outputStream.Write(newbuffer, 0, readCount);

However, there is no reason to create the newbuffer array at all. Just write the data from the buffer array:

readCount = input.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
if (readCount > 0) {
  outputStream.Write(buffer, 0, readCount);
}

However, this will only read the first block of data from the stream. You need to loop until there is no more data to read:

do {
  readCount = input.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
  if (readCount > 0) {
    outputStream.Write(buffer, 0, readCount);
  }
} until (readCount == 0);
share|improve this answer
1  
It should also be noted that if you're using .NET 4, you can utilize the new CopyTo stream extension. –  M.Babcock Jan 30 '12 at 2:05
    
Thanks a lot M.Babcock,Moozhe,Jason,LukeH,Guffa,BrokenGlass for your great help –  Usher Jan 30 '12 at 3:08
    
why i got the Minus reputation for this question guys ? –  Usher Jan 30 '12 at 3:14

Why ToArray()? newbuffer is an array of bytes and you may write it like:

outputStream.Write(newbuffer, 0, readCount);

However you may import System.Linq namespace.

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thanks for your help.Already changed my code to outputStream.Write(newbuffer, 0, readCount); even it works with out import System.Linq namespace. –  Usher Jan 30 '12 at 3:06
    
@Usher - Typo. No need to import System.Linq if you don't want to use extension methods. –  AVD Jan 30 '12 at 3:28
    
thanks a lot again –  Usher Jan 30 '12 at 3:29

You don't need a temporary buffer - just copy the stream directly using CopyTo() (.NET 4 required):

using (Stream input = response.GetResponseStream())
{
    input.CopyTo(outputStream);
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a bunch guys, am using outputStream.Write(newbuffer, 0, readCount); it works fine but the code was suggested by another expert (DotNetuser) by stackoverflow,so i was trying to execute his code and it start throwing exception at ToArray,then i thought am missing something.That's why i asked here. Can you please take the "Minus" reputation whoever gave it to me. –  Usher Jan 30 '12 at 3:04

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