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I am using mysql with InnoDB databases.

If all my transactions are Inserts and Selects (no updates), I assume I would not have to worry about SQL deadlocking.

I can't see a scenario where deadlocking would occur. Am I correct to assume deadlocking cannot occur if I only do Inserts and Selects?

May not be relevant but everything transaction is done with PDO

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There are different INSERT statements: INSERT ... VALUES ..., INSERT ... SELECT .... Do you use both or only the first variant? –  ypercube Feb 1 '12 at 20:04
    
There is also INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE. I guess you don't have that. –  ypercube Feb 1 '12 at 20:31
    
And is this question about a specific transaction isolation level? Or a general one (about all of them)? –  ypercube Feb 1 '12 at 20:33

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No. You still have to worry about SQL deadlocking.

You can get deadlocks even in the case of a transaction that inserts a single row. This is because the insert operation is not really atomic and locks are set automatically on the (possibly several) index records of the inserted row.

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If you only run INSERT INTO ... VALUES statements, can a deadlock occur? Can you give an example? –  ypercube Feb 1 '12 at 20:16
    
that's really not relevant to whether a deadlock can occur in this case. The insert 'may' lock part of the index regardless of whether you are using INSERT VALUES or INSERT SELECT, etc. –  Ben English Feb 1 '12 at 20:43
    
Any transaction may lock rows or tables or indexes. But different types of transaction do different types of locks. This has to do with how deadlocks occur. –  ypercube Feb 1 '12 at 20:47
    
An obvious example is a duplicate key error which causes a shared lock on the duplicate index record. Which can result in deadlock if multiple sessions are trying to insert the same row. –  Ben English Feb 1 '12 at 20:55
    
Session 1: START TRANSACTION; INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(1); Session 2: START TRANSACTION; INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(1); Session 3: START TRANSACTION; INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(1); Session 1: ROLLBACK; DEADLOCK –  Ben English Feb 1 '12 at 20:57

InnoDB MySQL storage engine has row level locks while the MyISAM MySQL storage engine has table level locks. MyISAM simply locks entire tables, and doesn't support transactions, so it's not possible to have database-level deadlocks. Note that an app can lock up another app by sitting on a table lock on the table they are both trying to access, but this is a code error, not a db-level "deadlock".

InnoDB supports transactions and has row-level locks, so db-level deadlocks are possible (and can happen occasionally in a busy system so you do need to code around them). Many of what MySQL will call "deadlocks" aren't "true deadlocks" as much as they're the result of slow UPDATEs causing other queries to time out on row locks.

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