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Ideally, I'd like a solution in Ruby or Javascript. Arrays instead of ranges in javascript would be fine.

I'd like input such as:

    [0..301, 230..268, 242..364, 574..579, 587..593]

or

    [0,301, 230,268, 242,364, 574,579, 587,593]

And turn it into something like:

    [0..230, 230..242, 242..268, 268..301, 301..364, 574..579, 587..593]

or

    [[0,230], [230,242, [242,268], [268,301], [301,364], [574,579, [587,593]]

Any help would be great. This sort of helps but not fully because it gives the full range instead of the chunked ranges, How do I summarize array of integers as an array of ranges?.

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Javascript doesn't have ranges like you've specified. What input/output format do you want if it's javascript? –  jfriend00 Jan 30 '12 at 3:02
    
Arrays for javascript like [[0,230],[230,242]...] would be fine. My bad, missed that. –  phuphighter Jan 30 '12 at 3:23
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's a ruby solution:

ranges = [0..301, 230..268, 242..364, 574..579, 587..593]
endpoints = ranges.map{|r| [r.first, r.last]}.flatten.sort
values = ranges.map{|r| r.to_a}.reduce(:+)

new_ranges = []
endpoints.reduce do |x, y|
    r = Range.new(x,y);
    new_ranges << r if r.all?{|v| values.include? v}
    y
end

puts new_ranges

#0..230
#230..242
#242..268
#268..301
#301..364
#574..579
#587..593
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This is perfect! Very, very nice Ruby solution. –  phuphighter Jan 30 '12 at 5:39
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Ruby solution.

def f(a)
  a.map! {|r| [r.first, r.last ] }.sort!

  segs = [a.shift]
  a.each {|s, e|
    if segs.last.last < s
      segs << [s, e]
    else
      segs.last.concat [s, e]
      segs.last.sort!
    end
  }
  segs.map {|seg|
    seg.each_cons(2).map { |s, e| (s..e) }
  }.flatten
end

puts f([0..301, 230..268, 242..364, 574..579, 587..593])

#0..230
#230..242
#242..268
#268..301
#301..364
#574..579
#587..593
share|improve this answer
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Here is a Javascript solution:

(function (inp) {
    var out = [];

    inp.reduce(function (a,b) {
        return a.concat(b);
    }).sort().forEach(function(v,k, flat) {
        if(!k) return;
        out.push([flat[k-1], v]);
    });

    console.log(out);
})([[0,301], [230,268], [242,364], [574,579], [587,593]]);

This solution will only work with browsers that support Javascript 1.8. I had to adapt your input to be Javascript compatible, since as jfriend00 said, Javascript doesn't have ranges.

Here is the output:

[ [ 0, 230 ],
  [ 230, 242 ],
  [ 242, 268 ],
  [ 268, 301 ],
  [ 301, 364 ],
  [ 364, 574 ],
  [ 574, 579 ],
  [ 579, 587 ],
  [ 587, 593 ] ]
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That doesn't look like the output that the question asked for. –  jfriend00 Jan 30 '12 at 3:29
    
This is very close, but not 100% what I need yet. –  phuphighter Jan 30 '12 at 3:35
    
@jfriend00 Good call. I fixed it up. –  Alec Gorge Jan 30 '12 at 3:39
1  
Almost there...the output shouldn't have [364,574] and [579,587] because [574, 579] and [587,593] don't have any overlapping in the array. –  phuphighter Jan 30 '12 at 4:04
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