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I am implementing a generic Priority Queue as part of a homework project. I am wondering what to return when the PriorityQueue is empty. I could not return null.

What is the best method to handle this case? What is the best design choice when implementing such datastructures?

class PQueue<T> : IPQueue<T>
{
    T[] items;
    //..

    public T RemoveMax()
    {
        if(heapSize < 1)    //Heap Empty
             return default(T);

        T max = items[0];
        //..

        return max;
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would look for guidance in the framework classes here, i.e. Queue<T> - which throws an InvalidOperationException if you try and dequeue an item from an empty queue. This only makes sense though if you give consumers access to the number of items in the queue or at least if the queue is empty or not, i.e.:

public bool IsEmpty()
{
   return heapSize == 0;
}

public int Count
{
  get 
  {
    return heapSize;
  }
}
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That is a good option. I was trying to piggyback the empty check to RemoveMax. Thanks! –  Nemo Jan 30 '12 at 3:33

Throw an exception.

QueueEmptyException("Priority Queue is Empty")

Something like that.

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An alternative to throwing an exception is to use the Null Object Pattern (wiki) to return a <T> that "does nothing".

This may seem like unnecessary complication, but this will help you avoid try/catch operations on the queue access. It also avoids the anti-pattern of using exceptions to handle valid behaviour, and if your queue is often empty this could also pose performance issues, as exception handling is 'slow'.

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