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I need to know how to extract directory information from user inputted file, consider this code as example:


ECHO Drag and drop your .txt file here, after that press Enter:
SET txtfile=
SET /P txtfile=
ECHO.
CD %txtfile%
ofcourse that didn't work since i didn't extract filepath from %txtfile% and here the sample output i want:
C:\>Drag and drop your .txt file here, after that press Enter:
C:\somefolder\somesubfolder\somefile.txt
C:\>Press Enter to continue...

C:\somefolder\somesubfolder\>

notice it have change it working directory

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can extract the full path as follows:

@echo off
setlocal
echo Drag and drop your .txt file here, after that press Enter:
set txtfile=
set /p txtfile=
echo.
for %%i in (%txtfile%) do set txtdir=%%~dpi
for %%i in (%txtfile%) do set txtfil=%%~nxi
cd /d %txtdir%
dir %txtfil%
endlocal

The first for statement gets the drive and path, the second gets the filename and extension. I've used cd /d to change the drive and directory and just used setlocal/endlocal to preserve my path outside the script (you can remove these if you don't care).

The full range of ~-modifiers can be found by running "for /?" in a command window. It really is a powerful command, and these modifiers aren't restricted to "for", they can be used on any %1-type arguments to scripts as well.

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great work :D thanks –  Dels May 25 '09 at 9:34

The answer to this is used by taking what one person said and modifying it...

paxdiablo was on the right path, however that is not copy/pasteable. For his to work properly (and maybe it's just for me running Windows7) you need 2 files.

The first file: drag_drop.bat

@echo off
echo Drag and drop your .txt file here, after that press Enter:
set txtfile=
set /p txtfile=
echo.%txtfile%
call c:\temp\process_filename.bat %txtfile%

The second file: process_filename.bat

FOR %%i in (%txtfile%) do set txtdir=%~dp1
cmd /K "cd %txtdir%"

The reason I had to use 2 files is because the trigger for %~dp1 (which the syntax was wrong from paxdiablo - no offense I know you have 187k rep and I give you props for that [you had %%~dpi, %% is used in the echo to disable the special character '%' and dp1 is the delim that allows you to strip off the quotes, filepath from the filename - the same thing goes with %%~nxi] )

Anyhow, you need to call the batch file passing the other filename with it. This is where the second one comes in. This one strips the information necessary and then allows you to access that path and then opens that directory in your cmd prompt.

ALTERNATIVELY

You can do this from the same file...

@echo off
setlocal
IF '%process%'=='1' goto processFile
echo Drag and drop your .txt file here, after that press Enter:
set txtfile=
set /p txtfile=
echo.%txtfile%
set process=1
call c:\temp\dragdrop.bat %txtfile%

:processFile
set txtdir=
FOR %%1 in (%txtfile%) do set txtdir=%~dp1
cmd /K "cd %txtdir%"
endlocal
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2  
which the syntax was wrong from paxdiablo No, the syntax is correct of paxdiabolo's sample. Your syntax is wrong or at least obfuscating. FOR %%i in (%txtfile%) do set txtdir=%~dp1 you declare %%i but you use %1 (in this case %~dp1 works) but you should use %%~dpi –  jeb Feb 23 '12 at 6:45
    
Thanks, I also found another error that would correct this... adding the /K to the cmd line near the end allows you to enable the directory switch. –  rud3y Feb 27 '12 at 18:01
ECHO Drag and drop your .txt file here, after that press Enter:
SET txtfile=
SET /P txtfile=
ECHO.
CD %txtfile%\..

I don't really know why, but this works in XP, could work in NT also.

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1  
It works because the brain-dead cd command in XP does simple text substitutions to remove "." and ".." entries. Who would have thunk Microsoft's mistakes would one day prove useful? –  paxdiablo May 25 '09 at 9:02
    
work in XP thanks, dunno about NT –  Dels May 25 '09 at 9:33

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