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I have a file that needs a semicolon delimiter after the first field, which is 4 or 5 characters in length. I tried using sed (modified a sed script I found) and it was an epic fail...it inserted semicolons between every character. I just need to add a semicolon to the end of the first field.

Here is some example text:

2A19    kRSUnicode  205.8
2FA1A   kRSUnicode  206.2
2FA1B   kRSUnicode  207.5

And the output I'm hoping for:

2A19;   kRSUnicode  205.8
2FA1A;  kRSUnicode  206.2
2FA1B;  kRSUnicode  207.5

Anyone know how to do this? Thank you!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted
sed 's/[[:space:]]/;/'

or

sed 's/[[:space:]]/; /' # preserves the space char. 

Tabs and spaces are known as whitespace. The above will replace the first character of whitespace with a semicolon.

sed 's/[[:space:]]\{1,\}/;/'

This will replace the first instance of all whitespace with a semicolon.

sed 's/[[:space:]]\{1,\}/;/g'

or

tr '\t ' ';'

This will replace all instances of whitespace with a semicolon.

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Worked perfectly. Thanks! :-) –  user1149499 Jan 30 '12 at 18:21

Update

If you don't care about anything after the semi-colon, this is even more trivial with awk

$ awk '$0=$1";"' infile
2A19;
2FA1A;
2FA1B;

This is trivial with awk

awk '$1=$1";"' OFS='\t' infile

Output

$ awk '$1=$1";"' OFS='\t' infile
2A19;   kRSUnicode      205.8
2FA1A;  kRSUnicode      206.2
2FA1B;  kRSUnicode      207.5
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Based on the OP's comment below, "I'll be dropping the rest of the line so what comes after the semicolon doesn't matter." You can finish the whole task with: awk '$1=$1";" {print $1}' OFS='\t' infile –  galaxywatcher Jan 30 '12 at 11:48
    
@galaxywatcher thanks, appreciate it. Answer updated –  SiegeX Jan 30 '12 at 15:00

It really helps to include sample data and output in your question, but based on what you have said, the following will work

# replace the first space in a line with a semicolon.
printf    "sample data1, data2 data3\n" \
| sed 's/ /;/'

Produces the output

sample;data1, data2 data3

you can process whatever file you have with

sed 's/ /;/' file > newFile

Or if your using Linux with GNU sed

sed -i 's/ /;/' file

I hope this helps.

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I was adding in some code samples at your suggestion and noticed that it's not a space at all -- it's a TAB char! So your kindly offered sed script didn't work; however, you made me hopeful that this isn't particularly hard. I just need to add a semicolon to the first item. I'll be dropping the rest of the line so what comes after the semicolon doesn't matter. Just the first part. –  user1149499 Jan 30 '12 at 4:24
    
@user1149499, this is obviously an important requirement -- please edit your question to include it. –  glenn jackman Jan 30 '12 at 11:44

you can loop below sed command for every line

echo "abcde I am a good boy" |sed -e 's/ /:/'

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Update:

sed 's/\(\s\+\)/;\1/' file

Based on the Input Data, you can match the first tab and add ; before it.

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat file
2A19    kRSUnicode  205.8
2FA1A   kRSUnicode  206.2
2FA1B   kRSUnicode  207.5

[jaypal:~/Temp] sed 's/\(\s\+\)/;\1/' file
2A19;    kRSUnicode  205.8
2FA1A;   kRSUnicode  206.2
2FA1B;   kRSUnicode  207.5
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Here is a shell only method: It wasn't 100% clear on whether the first delimiter space was a tab or a variable number of spaces, so I just used echo to squeeze them all into 1 space here

FILE="tmpfile"
OUTPUT=""
while read LINE || [ "$LINE" ]; do
    LINE=`echo $LINE`
OUTPUT="${OUTPUT}${LINE/ /; }
"
done < "${FILE}"
echo "${OUTPUT}" > "${FILE}"

or if it is in fact a single tab, simply:

...
while read LINE || [ "$LINE" ]; do
    OUTPUT="${OUTPUT}${LINE/    /; }
"
done < "${FILE}"
...
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