Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an awk script that processes a csv file and produces a report that counts the number of rows for each column, named in the header field, that contain data /[A-Za-z0-9]/. What I would like to do is enhance the script and print the top 5 most duplicated data elements in each column.

Here is sample data:

Food|Type|Spicy
Broccoli|Vegetable|No
Lettuce|Vegetable|No
Spinach|Vegetable|No
Habanero|Vegetable|Yes
Swiss Cheese|Dairy|No
Milk|Dairy|No
Yogurt|Dairy|No
Orange Juice|Fruit|No
Papaya|Fruit|No
Watermelon|Fruit|No
Coconut|Fruit|No
Cheeseburger|Meat|No
Gorgonzola|Dairy|No
Salmon|Fish|
Apple|Fruit|No
Orange|Fruit|No
Bagel|Bread|No
Chicken|Meat|No
Chicken Wings|Meat|Yes
Pizza||No

This is the current script that SiegeX has substantially contributed:

$ cat matrix2.awk 
NR==1{
  for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)
    head[i]=$i
  next
}
{
  for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)
  {
    if($i && !arr[i,$i]++)
      n[i]++
    if(arr[i,$i] > 1)
      f[i]=1
  }
}
END{
  for(i=1;i<=length(head);i++) {
    printf("%-6d%s\n",n[i],head[i])
    if(f[i]) {
      for(x in arr) {
        split(x,b,SUBSEP)
        if(b[1]==i && b[2])
          printf("% -6d %s\n",arr[i,b[2]],b[2])
      }
    }
  }
}

This is the current output:

$ awk -F "|" -f matrix2.awk testlist.csv 
20    Food
6     Type
 6     Fruit
 4     Vegetable
 3     Meat
 1     Fish
 4     Dairy
 1     Bread
2     Spicy
 17    No
 2     Yes

And this is the desired output:

$ awk -F "|" -f matrix2.awk testlist.csv 
20    Food
6     Type
 6     Fruit
 4     Vegetable
 4     Dairy
 3     Meat
 1     Fish
2     Spicy
 17    No
 2     Yes

The only thing left that I would like to add is a general function that limits each columns output to the top 5 most duplicated fields. As mentioned below, a columnar version of sort |uniq -c |sort -nr |head -5.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The following script is both extensible and scalable as it will work with an arbitrary number of columns. Nothing is hardcoded

awk -F'|' '
NR==1{
  for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)
    head[i]=$i
  next
}
{
  for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)
  {
    if($i && !arr[i,$i]++)
      n[i]++
    if(arr[i,$i] > 1)
      f[i]=1
  }
}
END{
  for(i=1;i<=length(head);i++) {
    printf("%-32s%d\n",head[i],n[i])
    if(f[i]) {
      for(x in arr) {
        split(x,b,SUBSEP)
        if(b[1]==i && b[2])
          printf("    %-28s%d\n",b[2],arr[i,b[2]])
      }
    }
  }
}' infile

Output

$ ./report
Food                            9
Type                            5
    Meat                        2
    Bread                       1
    Vegetable                   2
    Fruit                       2
    Fish                        1
Spicy                           2
    Yes                         2
    No                          6
share|improve this answer
    
This is brilliant! The only addition I would be grateful to see is limiting the output to the top 5 most frequently occurring duplicates in column. On files with thousands of records, listing all the elements becomes too much. An awk function equivalent to: sort |uniq -ci |sort -nr |head -5 # for each column would be perfect. –  galaxywatcher Jan 30 '12 at 9:07

Not a complete solution, but something to get you started -

awk -F"|" '
NR>1{
        a[$1]++;
        b[$2]++;
        c[$3]++}
END{
        print "Food\t\t\t" length(a); 
        print "Type\t\t\t" length(b); 
        for (x in b) 
            if (x!="") 
            {
                printf ("\t%-16s%s\n",x,b[x]);
            }
        print "Spicy\t\t\t" length(c); 
        for (y in c) 
            if (y!="") 
            {
                printf ("\t%-16s%d\n",y,c[y])
            }
}' testlist.csv 

TEST:

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat testlist.csv 
Food|Type|Spicy
Broccoli|Vegetable|No
Jalapeno|Vegetable|Yes
Salmon|Fish|
Apple|Fruit|No
Orange|Fruit|No
Bagel|Bread|No
Chicken|Meat|No
Chicken Wings|Meat|Yes
Pizza||No

[jaypal:~/Temp] awk -F"|" 'NR>1{a[$1];b[$2]++;c[$3]++}END{print "Food\t\t\t" length(a); print "Type\t\t\t"length(b); for (x in b) if (x!="") printf ("\t%-16s%s\n",x,b[x]) ;print "Spicy\t\t\t"length(c); for (y in c) if (y!="") {printf ("\t%-16s%d\n",y,c[y])}}' testlist.csv 
Food                9
Type                6
    Fruit           2
    Vegetable       2
    Bread           1
    Meat            2
    Fish            1
Spicy               3
    Yes             2
    No              6
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick response. I am still working on, and seeking help for, a more general solution that does not have field names hardcoded into the script. –  galaxywatcher Jan 30 '12 at 6:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.