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Hi I am writing a linked list data type. I have an inner class node that I use to store the elements and the successors. I am currently having trouble with my getElement in my node and my get method in my list. this is my getElement in the node

public E getElement(){
  return this.element;
}

where element is an instance variable declared by E element. However when I try to return it in my gets method like this

    public E get(int index){
    Node current;
    if(index < 0 || index >= size)
      throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException();
    if(index == 0)
      return head.getElement();
    else{
      current = head;
      for(int i = 0; i< index; i++){

        current = current.getSuccessor();
      }
      return current.getElement();
    }
  }

I get the error cannot convert from object to type E. I can hack around it and type cast it to an E but I feel like there is some underlying thing about generics that I am missing. If you've guess that this is for homework you are correct and thank you in advance.

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2  
I have seen homework questions much worse than this one. –  The Nail Jan 30 '12 at 7:39
    
What does getElement return? An object? An E type? –  Adrian Jan 30 '12 at 7:39
    
can you please post the whole class and inner class? –  breezee Jan 30 '12 at 7:40
    
At first glance the code you've shown looks OK. On which line do you get the error? –  NPE Jan 30 '12 at 7:40
    
How do you declare the Node class? Is it generic: Node<E>? –  dcernahoschi Jan 30 '12 at 7:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You probably want Node to be generic too, so you'd have

public E get(int index){
  if(index < 0 || index >= size)
    throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException();

  Node<E> current = head;
  for(int i = 0; i < index; i++) {
    current = current.getSuccessor();
  }
  return current.getElement();
}

(I've simplified your code a little at the same time. In particular, it's a good idea to declare variables at the point at which you actually need them.)

Node<E> would look like this:

class Node<E> {
    private final E element;
    private Node<E> successor;

    public Node(E element) {
        this.element = element;
    }

    // etc
}
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1  
I can't upvote the Jon Skeet answer because I ran out of votes for the day! Curses! Foiled again... –  blahman Jan 30 '12 at 7:45
1  
Let me do that for you. –  The Nail Jan 30 '12 at 7:46
    
You were correct, I did need node to be generic, thank you very much Mr. skeet –  Erik Jan 30 '12 at 8:00

Assuming the Node class in generic, like it should be, your current variable should be declared like this:

Node<E> current;

The same goes for head and any other Nodes you may have.

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