Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have to small programs

First

// compile with -lpthread
// TEST:
// basename


#include <pthread.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <libgen.h>
#include <limits.h>
#include <inttypes.h>


// DATASET_LEN
#ifndef DATASET_LEN
#define DATASET_LEN 10000
#endif
// THREADS_NUM
#ifndef THREADS_NUM
#define THREADS_NUM 16
#endif


// need to call free(3) after
char** generateArray() {
    char** dataset = (char**)malloc(sizeof(char*) * DATASET_LEN);
    // fill dataset
    for (size_t i = 0; i < DATASET_LEN; ++i) {
        dataset[i] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * CHAR_MAX);
        sprintf(dataset[i], "%i/%i/", rand(), rand());
    }

    return dataset;
}

// pthread_create(3) callback
void* run(void* args) {
    char** dataset = generateArray();
    char* baseName;

    for (size_t i = 0; i < DATASET_LEN; ++i) {
        baseName = basename(dataset[i]);
        printf("%s\n", baseName);

        free(dataset[i]);
    }

    free(dataset);
}

// main
int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    pthread_t* threads = (pthread_t*)malloc(sizeof(pthread_t) * THREADS_NUM);
    // threads start
    for (int i = 1; i <= THREADS_NUM; ++i) {
        pthread_create(&threads[i-1], NULL, run, NULL);
        fprintf(stderr, "Thread %u started\n", i);
    }
    // threads join
    for (int i = 1; i <= THREADS_NUM; ++i) {
        pthread_join(threads[i-1], NULL);
        fprintf(stderr, "Thread %u finished\n", i);
    }
    free(threads);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Second:

// compile with -lpthread
// TEST:
// basename


#include <pthread.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <libgen.h>
#include <limits.h>
#include <inttypes.h>
#include <string>


// DATASET_LEN
#ifndef DATASET_LEN
#define DATASET_LEN 10000
#endif
// THREADS_NUM
#ifndef THREADS_NUM
#define THREADS_NUM 16
#endif


// need to call free(3) after
char** generateArray() {
    char** dataset = (char**)malloc(sizeof(char*) * DATASET_LEN);
    // fill dataset
    for (size_t i = 0; i < DATASET_LEN; ++i) {
        dataset[i] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * CHAR_MAX);
        sprintf(dataset[i], "%i/%i/", rand(), rand());
    }

    return dataset;
}

// pthread_create(3) callback
void* run(void* args) {
    char** dataset = generateArray();
    char* baseName;
    std::string tmpStr;

    for (size_t i = 0; i < DATASET_LEN; ++i) {
        baseName = basename(dataset[i]);
        tmpStr = std::string(baseName);
        printf("%s\n", tmpStr.c_str());

        free(dataset[i]);
    }

    free(dataset);
}

// main
int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    pthread_t* threads = (pthread_t*)malloc(sizeof(pthread_t) * THREADS_NUM);
    // threads start
    for (int i = 1; i <= THREADS_NUM; ++i) {
        pthread_create(&threads[i-1], NULL, run, NULL);
        fprintf(stderr, "Thread %u started\n", i);
    }
    // threads join
    for (int i = 1; i <= THREADS_NUM; ++i) {
        pthread_join(threads[i-1], NULL);
        fprintf(stderr, "Thread %u finished\n", i);
    }
    free(threads);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Both programs, works normal at linux, but on freebsd first(without std::string) not works
Can anybody explain why?

I see freebsd src at /usr/src/lib/libc/gen/basename.c and see a static var in function.
But because of it, with std::string program also must not works normal

By normal I mean, it output only numbers, and new lines

For tests I use: ./freebsd-threaded-basename | egrep -av '^[0-9\n\s]+$' | env LANG=c less

UPD I try to use strdup() or strcpy() result is the same - not normal
UPD *Every* time the version with std::string is run it works as expected

share|improve this question
    
A small point: Why don't you assign directly to tmpStr in the version with std::string? Like tmpStr = basename(dataset[i]); –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 30 '12 at 8:44
    
Because I wrote this small test-program fast, I just test this code with that remark that you advice, result is the same –  azat Jan 30 '12 at 9:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

The reason for your programs to behave unpredictably is basename, which is not thread-safe. basename is a little bit outdated. Modern C++ applications tend to use other means for parsing file path. Boost Filesystem Library is popular and may be used to do it.

If you insist on using basename, place it to critical section together with some code which will get basename's result (be it printf, or strcpy, or some other). This guarantees that basename's result is not accessed from several threads simultaneously. Which means correct behavior.

Now some guesswork about "why". (Only guesswork, because it's not possible to predict, how exactly non-threadsafe multithreaded program works).

First version of your program performs basename loop partially in parallel (basename function and the loop itself), partially sequentially (printf and free are thread-safe functions, their implementation is protected by critical sections).

Second version adds std::string, which means a lot more sequential code. It allocates memory for a new string, deallocates old memory (both these operations are thread-safe and protected by critical sections). Also (in some implementations) is uses atomic operations to update shared counter, and this decreases parallelism as well. All this actually transforms your program from parallel to fully sequential. All the threads are mostly waiting for some mutex. Or sometimes perform some complicated printf/memory/std::string computations. And very rarely one of the threads does relatively simple basename computations. Almost as if you added a critical section around basename.

Possibly, correct results for Linux tests are because printf and free are enough to make the program almost sequential in this case. (Because something is done differently in Linux or because of different hardware).

share|improve this answer
    
Summarize, because of that std::string contructor is thread safe, and wait for some mutex, all program wait it too, and because of this data is read/write normally? But when I pass variable to std::string constructor can be this code non-thread safe? –  azat Feb 21 '12 at 19:33
    
No, this still cannot be thread safe. Everything looks OK only because all threads are too busy synchronizing on mutexes. So there is always some chance to have problems, even with std::string. Also it is likely that one thread will print the number, generated in other thread (which is hard to notice with random numbers). –  Evgeny Kluev Feb 21 '12 at 19:55
    
I understand this, thanks. –  azat Feb 21 '12 at 19:58

This is explained in the manual page for basename() on FreeBSD, which you can find here:

http://www.freebsd.org/cgi/man.cgi?query=basename&sektion=3

In particular:

IMPLEMENTATION NOTES The basename() function returns a pointer to internal storage space allo- cated on the first call that will be overwritten by subsequent calls. basename_r() is therefore preferred for threaded applications.

So the data that you get returned from basename() can have been overwritten by the other threads you are using. Using basename_r prevents this.

share|improve this answer
2  
I should add that the reason it works in the second program looks like pure luck (and some timing). std::string will make a copy of the string in its constructor, which is the first thing that thread will do after calling basename(), so it will read the string 'straight away'. In the implementation without the std::string, we go into printf after the basename() call, which needs to handle variable arguments and parse the format string before it actually does anything with the given string. So there's a much higher chance that it has been overwritten by that time. –  AVL Jan 30 '12 at 16:16
    
No it is not pure luck or coping string in constructor. I try to use strdup() or strcpy() result is the same - not normal –  azat Jan 30 '12 at 18:44

From the Linux manual page on pthreads:

POSIX.1-2001 and POSIX.1-2008 require that all functions specified in the standard shall be thread-safe, except for the following functions:

[List of functions]

basename()

So the basename is not guaranteed to be thread-safe (though some implementations may do it). If you want your application to be portable you have to protect the call with something like a mutex.

Also see the POSIX reference where it explicitly says:

The basename() function may modify the string pointed to by path, and may return a pointer to static storage that may then be overwritten by a subsequent call to basename().

The basename() function need not be thread-safe.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand this. But why with std::string it works normal? –  azat Jan 30 '12 at 9:38
    
@azat Every time the version with std::string is run it works as expected, but never with the other version? All the time or just most of the time? –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 30 '12 at 9:41
    
Of course all the time. –  azat Jan 30 '12 at 9:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.