Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the example below I am trying to capture the text between the two asterixes.

var str="The *rain in SPAIN* stays mainly in the plain"; 
var patt1=/\*...\*/;
console.log(str.match(patt1));

I'm trying to follow the example here

http://www.regular-expressions.info/examples.html

\Q...\E Matches the characters between \Q and \E literally, suppressing the meaning of special characters.

But I am having trouble following along

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try

var str="The *rain in SPAIN* stays mainly in the plain"; 
var patt1=/\*.*\*/;
console.log(str.match(patt1));

The \* means the literal "*" character. Then the . means any character and * means any number of times, so .* means "any number of characters".


Optional bonus:

The code above should work fine, but you'll notice that it matches greedily. So with input abcd*efgh*ijkl*mnop, the output will be *efgh*ijkl*, whereas you might have preferred the non-greedy match *efgh*.

To do this, use

var patt1=/\*.*?\*/;

The ? operator indicates non-greediness and ensures the least number of characters possible to get to the next \* are eaten, whereas without the ?, the most characters possible to get to the next \* are eaten.

To learn more I recommend http://www.regular-expressions.info/repeat.html . In particular read the "laziness instead of greediness" part.

share|improve this answer

Use .* and () to capture groups:

var str = "The *rain in SPAIN* stays mainly* in the plain"; 
var patt1 = /\*(.*)\*/;

console.log(str.match(patt1));

And the result:

["*rain in SPAIN* in the plain*", "rain in SPAIN* in the plain"]

If you use:

var patt1=/\*([^*]+)\*/;

the result will be:

["*rain in SPAIN*", "rain in SPAIN"]
share|improve this answer

Why the three dots? ...

var str="The *rain in SPAIN* stays mainly in the plain"; 
var patt1=/\*.*\*/;
console.log(str.match(patt1));
share|improve this answer

I'm not sure where you're seeing the ... in the example. a . is a single instance of any char (a wild card. So, in your example what you would need to do is this...

var patt1=/\*.*?\*/;

However you're going to get the * on both sides as part of your result.

You're searching for an actual *

then you're searching for any number of . (wild cards)... any number because * also means as many as you find

but the ? means that you should stop if you encounter the next thing

which in your case is a litteral * again.

so... to translate

ASTERISK(anything as many times at it happens until another)ASTERISK

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.