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Is there a standard pointer class (or Boost) which is a non-shared pointer that works with incomplete types? I've gone over the C++11 standard and the boost library and can't find one, though it seems like a very useful type.

For example, I'd like to be able to make opaque types using a smart pointer.

  class A;
  wrap_ptr<A> some_func();
  void other_func( A const & );

A is an opaque type which can be used for a variety of functions. The user of the above interface has only an incomplete definition of A but should be able to delete/reset the pointer. I know the above can be done with a shared_ptr but that has an overhead I don't want in this particular code. unique_ptr has the right ownership semantics, but can't work with an incomplete type. In theory a wrapper should need only the overhead of having a pointer to a deleter.

Is there such a type in C++11 or the boost libraries?

NOTE: I understand I can easily build this type, but I'd prefer a standard type if possible. It seems like it should be a fundamental smart pointer type.


UPDATE: unique_ptr does not appear to be a good option. First off the syntax overhead would be offsetting. Secondly I'm not convinced it can be safely used with a custom deleter. I'll check to see how it might work.

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3 Answers 3

Actually, unique_ptr can work with incomplete types, as long as you specify a custom deleter.

However, contrary to shared_ptr, this actually influence its type, as the custom deleter is precised statically (as the second template parameter).

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While technically true, using this directly is syntactically unfriendly. You can't simply do ptr_type( new T ) but, assuming you get the template typedef correct, you must do ptr_type( new T, T::~T ). –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jan 30 '12 at 9:46
1  
Actually, looking closely unique_ptr cannot use a custom deleter with a state. The reset function doesn't allow specifying a deleter, only the constructor does, therefore the custom deletion aspect of unique_ptr is partially broken. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jan 30 '12 at 9:47
    
No custom deleter needed, the type only needs to be complete when the destructor of unique_ptr would be invoked, which means you can define the destructor after the held class is complete. –  Xeo Jan 30 '12 at 13:20
1  
@Xeo: First, The destructor is also necessary for move assignment and reset (I can't think of any other method). Secondly, the OP is not talking about a deferred definition, but about an Opaque Type. In C this is a typical case where the client never ever see the definition. –  Matthieu M. Jan 30 '12 at 13:59
    
@edA-qamort-ora-y: "Actually, looking closely unique_ptr cannot use a custom deleter with a state." Not true. The standard specifically says that it will hold a copy of the deleter (20.7.1.2.1, p12). Just because reset can't reset the deleter's value doesn't mean the value is unused. reset doesn't take a deleter because deleters can be stored by reference in unique_ptrs. And thus you aren't guaranteed to be able to replace them. –  Nicol Bolas Jan 30 '12 at 14:48

To be clear about unique_ptr : it does work with incomplete type, but if you use it in a header of a class like that :

#include <memory>

class A;

class B
{

std::unique_ptr<A> m_a;

};

It will not link because of the missing deleter implementation. There is an easy fix to this : just define de destructor of the host class in a cpp, even if it's empty or should be the default one!

// B.hpp
#include <memory>

class A;

class B
{
public:

    B();
    ~B();

private:

std::unique_ptr<A> m_a;

};

// B.cpp

B::B(){} // or =default; (if you have a compiler providing it)
B::~B(){} // or =default; (if you have a compiler providing it)

Also, read answers to my question there : Does std::unique_ptr<T> requires to know the full T definition?

And maybe take a look at how pimpl idiom (implying uncomplete type in a unique_ptr) is recommended to be implmented by Herb Sutter: http://herbsutter.com/gotw/_100/

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This isn't the use I want. I want to use the pointer in the return value of the function, in a place where the caller will never see the complete type. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jan 30 '12 at 15:21

std::unique_ptr can handle this case, but not with the default deleter. You need to write a deleter that can handle an incomplete type, and then use std::unique_ptr<A,MyDeleter>.

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