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Can some body explain me the differences between a Document style and RPC style webservices? Apart from JAX-RPC next version is JAX-WS, which supports Document style and RPC, I also studied that document style webservices are meant for Asynchronous style of communication, where client would not block until the response is received.

In either way of writing services using JAX-WS, I currently annotate the service with @Webservice, generate the WSDL and from that WSDL I generate the client side artifacts.

Once the artifacts are received, in both styles of communication, I invoke the method on the port. Now, this does not differ in RPC style and Document style. So what is the difference and where is that difference visible?

Similarly, in what way SOAP over HTTP differ from XML over HTTP? After all SOAP is also XML document with SOAP namespace. So what is the difference here?

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possible duplicate of Document or RPC based web services –  skaffman Jan 30 '12 at 10:36

5 Answers 5

RPC style web service uses the names of the method and its parameters to generate XML structures that represent a method’s call stack. While document style indicates that the SOAP body contains a XML document which can be validated against pre-defined XML schema document. A good starting point : http://java.globinch.com/enterprise-java/web-services/soap-binding-document-rpc-style-web-services-difference/

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Can some body explain me the differences between a Document style and RPC style webservices?

There are two communication style models that are used to translate a WSDL binding to a SOAP message body. They are: Document & RPC

The advantage of using a Document style model is that you can structure the SOAP body any way you want it as long as the content of the SOAP message body is any arbitrary XML instance. The Document style is also referred to as Message-Oriented style.

However, with an RPC style model, the structure of the SOAP request body must contain both the operation name and the set of method parameters. The RPC style model assumes a specific structure to the XML instance contained in the message body.

Furthermore, there are two encoding use models that are used to translate a WSDL binding to a SOAP message. They are: literal, and encoded

When using a literal use model, the body contents should conform to a user-defined XML-schema(XSD) structure. The advantage is two-fold. For one, you can validate the message body with the user-defined XML-schema, moreover, you can also transform the message using a transformation language like XSLT.

With a (SOAP) encoded use model, the message has to use XSD datatypes, but the structure of the message need not conform to any user-defined XML schema. This makes it difficult to validate the message body or use XSLT based transformations on the message body.

The combination of the different style and use models give us four different ways to translate a WSDL binding to a SOAP message.

Document/literal
Document/encoded
RPC/literal
RPC/encoded

I would recommend that you read this article entitled Which style of WSDL should I use? by Russell Butek which has a nice discussion of the different style and use models to translate a WSDL binding to a SOAP message, and their relative strengths and weaknesses.

Once the artifacts are received, in both styles of communication, I invoke the method on the port. Now, this does not differ in RPC style and Document style. So what is the difference and where is that difference visible?

The place where you can find the difference is the "RESPONSE"!

RPC Style:

package com.sample;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import javax.jws.WebService;
import javax.jws.soap.SOAPBinding;
import javax.jws.soap.SOAPBinding.Style;

@WebService
@SOAPBinding(style=Style.RPC)
public interface StockPrice { 

    public String getStockPrice(String stockName); 

    public ArrayList getStockPriceList(ArrayList stockNameList); 
}

The SOAP message for second operation will have empty output and will look like:

RPC Style Response:

<ns2:getStockPriceListResponse 
       xmlns:ns2="http://sample.com/">
    <return/>
</ns2:getStockPriceListResponse>
</S:Body>
</S:Envelope>

Document Style:

package com.sample;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import javax.jws.WebService;
import javax.jws.soap.SOAPBinding;
import javax.jws.soap.SOAPBinding.Style;

@WebService
@SOAPBinding(style=Style.DOCUMENT)
public interface StockPrice {

    public String getStockPrice(String stockName);

    public ArrayList getStockPriceList(ArrayList stockNameList);
}

If we run the client for the above SEI, the output is:

123 [123, 456]

This output shows that ArrayList elements are getting exchanged between the web service and client. This change has been done only by the changing the style attribute of SOAPBinding annotation. The SOAP message for the second method with richer data type is shown below for reference:

Document Style Response:

<ns2:getStockPriceListResponse 
       xmlns:ns2="http://sample.com/">
<return xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"  
        xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
        xsi:type="xs:string">123</return>
<return xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
        xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
        xsi:type="xs:string">456</return>
</ns2:getStockPriceListResponse>
</S:Body>
</S:Envelope>

Conclusion

  • As you would have noticed in the two SOAP response messages that it is possible to validate the SOAP response message in case of DOCUMENT style but not in RPC style web services.
  • The basic disadvantage of using RPC style is that it doesn’t support richer data types and that of using Document style is that it brings some complexity in the form of XSD for defining the richer data types.
  • The choice of using one out of these depends upon the operation/method requirements and the expected clients.

Similarly, in what way SOAP over HTTP differ from XML over HTTP? After all SOAP is also XML document with SOAP namespace. So what is the difference here?

Why do we need a standard like SOAP? By exchanging XML documents over HTTP, two programs can exchange rich, structured information without the introduction of an additional standard such as SOAP to explicitly describe a message envelope format and a way to encode structured content.

SOAP provides a standard so that developers do not have to invent a custom XML message format for every service they want to make available. Given the signature of the service method to be invoked, the SOAP specification prescribes an unambiguous XML message format. Any developer familiar with the SOAP specification, working in any programming language, can formulate a correct SOAP XML request for a particular service and understand the response from the service by obtaining the following service details.

  • Service name
  • Method names implemented by the service
  • Method signature of each method
  • Address of the service implementation (expressed as a URI)

Using SOAP streamlines the process for exposing an existing software component as a Web service since the method signature of the service identifies the XML document structure used for both the request and the response.

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I think what you are asking (if I may assume) is the difference between RPC Literal, Document Literal and Document Wrapped SOAP web services.

Note that Document web services are delineated into literal and wrapped as well and they are different - one of the primary difference is that the latter is BP 1.1 compliant and the former is not.
Also, in Document Literal the operation to be invoked is not specified in terms of its name whereas in Wrapped, it is. This, I think, is a significant difference in terms of easily figuring out the operation name that the request is for.
In terms of RPC literal versus Document Wrapped, the Document Wrapped request can be easily vetted / validated against the schema in the WSDL - one big advantage.

I would suggest utilizing Document Wrapped as the web service type of choice due to its advantages.

SOAP on HTTP is the SOAP protocol bound to HTTP as the carrier. SOAP could be over SMTP or XXX as well. SOAP provides a way of interaction between entities (client and servers, for example) and both entities can marshal operation arguments / return values as per the semantics of the protocol.
If you were using XML over HTTP (and you can), it is simply understood to be XML payload on HTTP request / response. You would need to, for example, provide for the framework to marshal / unmarshal, error handling and so on.

A detailed tutorial with examples of WSDL and code with emphasis on Java:
http://khanna111.com/wordPressBlog/2013/11/21/248/

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The main scenario where JAX-WS RPC and Document style are used as follows:

  • The Remote Procedure Call (RPC) pattern is used when the consumer views the web service as a single logical application or component with encapsulated data. The request and response messages map directly to the input and output parameters of the procedure call.

    Examples of this type the RPC pattern might include a payment service or a stock quote service.

  • The document-based pattern is used in situations where the consumer views the web service as a longer running business process where the request document represents a complete unit of information. This type of web service may involve human interaction for example as with a credit application request document with a response document containing bids from lending institutions. Because longer running business processes may not be able to return the requested document immediately, the document-based pattern is more commonly found in asynchronous communication architectures. The Document/literal variation of SOAP is used to implement the document-based web service pattern.

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The Document style indicates that the SOAP body contains a XML document which can be validated against pre-defined XML schema document.

The RPC style that indicates that the SOAP body contains a XML representation of a method call and uses the names of the method and its parameters to generate XML structures that represent a method’s call stack.

The document/literal approach is easier because it simply relies on XML Schema to describe exactly what the SOAP message looks like while transmission.

See more at: http://java.globinch.com/enterprise-java/web-services/soap-binding-document-rpc-style-web-services-difference/#sthash.nqGZCbd0.dpuf

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Just repeated what is in the reference. This explanation does not helped me in understanding the difference. –  kinunt Mar 20 at 11:52

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