Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

On a web site, I am using django to make some requests :

The django line :

CINodeInventory.objects.select_related().filter(ci_class__type='equipment',company__slug=self.kwargs['company'])

generates a MySQL query like that :

SELECT *
FROM `inventory_cinodeinventory`
INNER JOIN `ci_cinodeclass` ON ( `inventory_cinodeinventory`.`ci_class_id` = `ci_cinodeclass`.`class_name` )
INNER JOIN `accounts_companyprofile` ON ( `inventory_cinodeinventory`.`company_id` = `accounts_companyprofile`.`slug` )
INNER JOIN `accounts_companysite` ON ( `inventory_cinodeinventory`.`company_site_id` = `accounts_companysite`.`slug` )
INNER JOIN `accounts_companyprofile` T5 ON ( `accounts_companysite`.`company_id` = T5.`slug` )
WHERE (
`ci_cinodeclass`.`type` = 'equipment'
AND `inventory_cinodeinventory`.`company_id` = 'thecompany'
)
ORDER BY `inventory_cinodeinventory`.`name` ASC

The problem is that for only 40 000 entries in the main table, it takes 0.5 seconds to process.

I checked all indexes, create the ones that is required for sorting or joinning : I still have problem.

The funny thing is that if I replace the last INNER JOIN by a LEFT JOIN, the request is 10x faster ! Unfortunately, As I am using django for requesting, I do not have access to the SQL requests it generates (I do not want to do raw SQL myself).

for the last join as an "INNER JOIN" the EXPLAIN gives:

+----+-------------+---------------------------+--------+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+------------------------------------+---------+------------------------------------------------+-------+---------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table                     | type   | possible_keys                                                                                            | key                                | key_len | ref                                            | rows  | Extra                           |
+----+-------------+---------------------------+--------+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+------------------------------------+---------+------------------------------------------------+-------+---------------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | accounts_companyprofile   | const  | PRIMARY                                                                                                  | PRIMARY                            | 152     | const                                          |     1 | Using temporary; Using filesort |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | inventory_cinodeinventory | range  | inventory_cinodeinventory_41ddcf59,inventory_cinodeinventory_543518c6,inventory_cinodeinventory_14fe63e9 | inventory_cinodeinventory_543518c6 | 152     | NULL                                           | 42129 | Using where                     |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | T5                        | ALL    | PRIMARY                                                                                                  | NULL                               | NULL    | NULL                                           |     3 | Using join buffer               |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | accounts_companysite      | eq_ref | PRIMARY,accounts_companysite_543518c6                                                                    | PRIMARY                            | 152     | cidb.inventory_cinodeinventory.company_site_id |     1 | Using where                     |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | ci_cinodeclass            | eq_ref | PRIMARY                                                                                                  | PRIMARY                            | 92      | cidb.inventory_cinodeinventory.ci_class_id     |     1 | Using where                     |
+----+-------------+---------------------------+--------+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+------------------------------------+---------+------------------------------------------------+-------+---------------------------------+

For the last join as "LEFT JOIN", I got :

+----+-------------+---------------------------+--------+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+---------+---------+------------------------------------------------+------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table                     | type   | possible_keys                                                                                            | key     | key_len | ref                                            | rows | Extra       |
+----+-------------+---------------------------+--------+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+---------+---------+------------------------------------------------+------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | accounts_companyprofile   | const  | PRIMARY                                                                                                  | PRIMARY | 152     | const                                          |    1 |             |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | inventory_cinodeinventory | index  | inventory_cinodeinventory_41ddcf59,inventory_cinodeinventory_543518c6,inventory_cinodeinventory_14fe63e9 | name    | 194     | NULL                                           |  173 | Using where |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | accounts_companysite      | eq_ref | PRIMARY                                                                                                  | PRIMARY | 152     | cidb.inventory_cinodeinventory.company_site_id |    1 |             |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | T5                        | eq_ref | PRIMARY                                                                                                  | PRIMARY | 152     | cidb.accounts_companysite.company_id           |    1 |             |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | ci_cinodeclass            | eq_ref | PRIMARY                                                                                                  | PRIMARY | 92      | cidb.inventory_cinodeinventory.ci_class_id     |    1 | Using where |
+----+-------------+---------------------------+--------+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+---------+---------+------------------------------------------------+------+-------------+

it seems for the "INNER JOIN" case, MySQL do not find any indexes for the T5 join : why ?

The profiling gives :

starting                            0.000011
checking query cache for query  0.000086
Opening tables                  0.000014
System lock                     0.000005
Table lock                          0.000052
init                            0.000064
optimizing                          0.000021
statistics                          0.000180
preparing                           0.000024
Creating tmp table                  0.000308
executing                           0.000003
Copying to tmp table            0.353414   !!!
Sorting result                  0.037244
Sending data                    0.035168
end                             0.000005
removing tmp table                  0.550974   !!!
end                             0.000009
query end                           0.000003
freeing items                   0.000113
storing result in query cache   0.000009
logging slow query                  0.000002
cleaning up                     0.000004

So it seems, there is a step where mysql uses a temporary table. This step does not occurs with a LEFT JOIN, only with the INNER JOIN. I tried to avoid that by including a "force index for join" in the query but it did not help...

join tables are :

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `accounts_companysite` (
  `slug` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `created` datetime NOT NULL,
  `modified` datetime NOT NULL,
  `deleted` tinyint(1) NOT NULL,
  `company_id` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `name` varchar(128) NOT NULL,
  `address` longtext NOT NULL,
  `city` varchar(64) NOT NULL,
  `zip_code` varchar(6) NOT NULL,
  `state` varchar(32) NOT NULL,
  `country` varchar(2) DEFAULT NULL,
  `phone` varchar(20) NOT NULL,
  `fax` varchar(20) NOT NULL,
  `more` longtext NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`slug`),
  KEY `accounts_companysite_543518c6` (`company_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `accounts_companyprofile` (
  `slug` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `created` datetime NOT NULL,
  `modified` datetime NOT NULL,
  `deleted` tinyint(1) NOT NULL,
  `name` varchar(128) NOT NULL,
  `address` longtext NOT NULL,
  `city` varchar(64) NOT NULL,
  `zip_code` varchar(6) NOT NULL,
  `state` varchar(32) NOT NULL,
  `country` varchar(2) DEFAULT NULL,
  `phone` varchar(20) NOT NULL,
  `fax` varchar(20) NOT NULL,
  `contract_id` varchar(32) NOT NULL,
  `more` longtext NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`slug`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `inventory_cinodeinventory` (
  `uuid` varchar(36) NOT NULL,
  `name` varchar(64) NOT NULL,
  `synopsis` varchar(64) NOT NULL,
  `path` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `created` datetime NOT NULL,
  `modified` datetime NOT NULL,
  `deleted` tinyint(1) NOT NULL,
  `root_id` varchar(36) DEFAULT NULL,
  `parent_id` varchar(36) DEFAULT NULL,
  `order` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `ci_class_id` varchar(30) NOT NULL,
  `data` longtext NOT NULL,
  `serial` varchar(64) NOT NULL,
  `company_id` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `company_site_id` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `vendor` varchar(48) NOT NULL,
  `type` varchar(64) NOT NULL,
  `model` varchar(64) NOT NULL,
  `room` varchar(30) NOT NULL,
  `rack` varchar(30) NOT NULL,
  `rack_slot` varchar(30) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`uuid`),
  KEY `inventory_cinodeinventory_1fb5ff88` (`root_id`),
  KEY `inventory_cinodeinventory_63f17a16` (`parent_id`),
  KEY `inventory_cinodeinventory_41ddcf59` (`ci_class_id`),
  KEY `inventory_cinodeinventory_543518c6` (`company_id`),
  KEY `inventory_cinodeinventory_14fe63e9` (`company_site_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

I also tried to tune MySQL by adding in my.cnf :

join_buffer_size        = 16M
tmp_table_size          = 160M
max_seeks_for_key       = 100

... but it does not help.

With django, it is easy to use Postgresql instead of Mysql, so I tried it : with the same query and same data in db, postgres is much faster that Mysql : x10 more faster while using INNER JOIN (analyse shows it uses indexes unlike Mysql)

DO you have an idea why my MySQL INNER JOIN is so slow ?

EDIT 1:

after some testing, I reduce the problem to this request :

SELECT *
FROM `inventory_cinodeinventory`
INNER JOIN `accounts_companyprofile` ON `inventory_cinodeinventory`.`company_id` = `accounts_companyprofile`.`slug`
ORDER BY `inventory_cinodeinventory`.`name` ASC

This request is very slow and I do not see why. Without the 'ORDER BY' clause, it is fast, but not with it, although, the name index is set :

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `inventory_cinodeinventory` (
  `uuid` varchar(36) NOT NULL,
  `name` varchar(64) NOT NULL,
  `synopsis` varchar(64) NOT NULL,
  `path` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `created` datetime NOT NULL,
  `modified` datetime NOT NULL,
  `deleted` tinyint(1) NOT NULL,
  `root_id` varchar(36) DEFAULT NULL,
  `parent_id` varchar(36) DEFAULT NULL,
  `order` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `ci_class_id` varchar(30) NOT NULL,
  `data` longtext NOT NULL,
  `serial` varchar(64) NOT NULL,
  `company_id` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `company_site_id` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `vendor` varchar(48) NOT NULL,
  `type` varchar(64) NOT NULL,
  `model` varchar(64) NOT NULL,
  `room` varchar(30) NOT NULL,
  `rack` varchar(30) NOT NULL,
  `rack_slot` varchar(30) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`uuid`),
  KEY `inventory_cinodeinventory_1fb5ff88` (`root_id`),
  KEY `inventory_cinodeinventory_63f17a16` (`parent_id`),
  KEY `inventory_cinodeinventory_41ddcf59` (`ci_class_id`),
  KEY `inventory_cinodeinventory_14fe63e9` (`company_site_id`),
  KEY `inventory_cinodeinventory_543518c6` (`company_id`,`name`),
  KEY `name` (`name`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

EDIT 2:

Previous request can be solved with a 'FORCE INDEX FOR ORDER BY (name)'. Unfortunately this tip does not work with the initial request in my topic...

EDIT 3:

I rebuilt the database with replacing 'uuid' primary keys from varchar to an integer : it does not help at all... bad news.

EDIT 4:

I tried Mysql 5.5.20 : not better. Postgresql 8.4 is 10x faster for this particular request.

I modified a little the resquest (removed the T5 join) :

SELECT *
FROM `inventory_cinodeinventory`
INNER JOIN `ci_cinodeclass` ON ( `inventory_cinodeinventory`.`ci_class_id` = `ci_cinodeclass`.`class_name` )
INNER JOIN `accounts_companyprofile` ON ( `inventory_cinodeinventory`.`company_id` = `accounts_companyprofile`.`slug` )
INNER JOIN `accounts_companysite` ON ( `inventory_cinodeinventory`.`company_site_id` = `accounts_companysite`.`slug` )
WHERE (
`ci_cinodeclass`.`type` = 'equipment'
AND `inventory_cinodeinventory`.`company_id` = 'thecompany'
)
ORDER BY `inventory_cinodeinventory`.`name` ASC

This is working fine, but I have some other requests, just a little different where this trick is not working.

In fact, after searching, it seems that as soon you join 2 tables that have "a lot in common" that is, let's say, half the rows of the right table can be join to those on the left table (it is my case) : Mysql prefer using table scanning instead of index : faster I found somewhere (!!)

share|improve this question
1  
install and configure django-debug-toolbar and you will easily be able to see the sql django is generating pypi.python.org/pypi/django-debug-toolbar. Do you definitely need the select_related for the intended use? –  shawnwall Jan 30 '12 at 13:05
    
Yes, I absolutely need the select_related, and Yes I already use the django-debug-toolbar : the SQL request I gave comes from this tool. (for ease of reading, in the request, I just put a '*' instead of the long list of requested columns) –  Eric Jan 30 '12 at 22:28
    
Your explain says there is an index on inventory_cinodeinventory.name, but it's not present in your schema. Something's not right. –  Marcus Adams Feb 1 '12 at 14:46
    
@Marcus : even not written, I made many tries while writing my explain. I did try a name index as well as a (company_id, name) index. –  Eric Feb 1 '12 at 20:36
    
BTW, "copying to tmp table" isn't such a bad thing. It can often be involved in a fast query, especially if there's a UNION involved. It's only a bad thing if it's copying a ton of rows to, for instance, do a manual ORDER or resolve a complex WHERE clause which isn't using an index, which is what's happening above. –  Conspicuous Compiler Feb 2 '12 at 20:10
add comment

6 Answers 6

Your real issue is with the second line in your first explain:

+----+-------------+---------------------------+--------+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+------------------------------------+---------+------------------------------------------------+-------+---------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table                     | type   | possible_keys                                                                                            | key                                | key_len | ref                                            | rows  | Extra                           |
+----+-------------+---------------------------+--------+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+------------------------------------+---------+------------------------------------------------+-------+---------------------------------+   
|  1 | SIMPLE      | inventory_cinodeinventory | range  | inventory_cinodeinventory_41ddcf59,inventory_cinodeinventory_543518c6,inventory_cinodeinventory_14fe63e9 | inventory_cinodeinventory_543518c6 | 152     | NULL                                           | 42129 | Using where                     |

You're analyzing 42129 rows using this WHERE clause:

AND `inventory_cinodeinventory`.`company_id` = 'thecompany'

If you don't already have one, you should have an index on inventory_cinodeinventory for (company_id, name)

i.e.

ALTER TABLE `inventory_cinodeinventory`
  ADD INDEX `inventory_cinodeinventory__company_id__name` (`company_id`, `name`);

That way your WHERE and ORDER BY clauses don't wind up conflicting, causing a bad index selection, which appears to be happening right now.

If you do already have an index with those columns, in that order, I would suggest running OPTIMIZE TABLE inventory_cinodeinventory; to see if it it gets MySQL to use the correct index.

In general, you've got a larger issue (which I presume is due to Django's design, but I lack experience using that framework) in that you have these huge keys. All of the keys in your EXPLAIN are 152 and 92 bytes in length. This makes for much larger indexes, which means more disk access, which means slower queries. Primary and foreign keys would ideally be ints or very short varchar columns (e.g. varchar(10)). varchar(50) for these keys is going to put a significant constant multiple on your DB response time.

share|improve this answer
2  
Re: Django -- it looks like the OP is specifically overriding the auto-generated ID field, and using the varchar(50) 'slug' field as the PK. That's definitely fixable within his model definitions. –  Ian Clelland Jan 30 '12 at 23:16
    
I need this 'slug' as a PK, for some reasons, all PK must be 'natural' aka be a varchar... –  Eric Jan 31 '12 at 14:55
1  
@Conspicuous Compiler : I tried your indexes and shorterned slugs, but MySQL continues to have a 'Copying to tmp table' in profiling. –  Eric Jan 31 '12 at 15:04
    
@Eric: Wait, "indexes"? I only listed a single index to add. If you added one on each column, it won't do you any good. Can you post the results of a SHOW CREATE TABLE inventory_cinodeinventory? –  Conspicuous Compiler Jan 31 '12 at 17:11
2  
@Eric: As far as natural IDs, I can't speak to your business requirements, but you can have unique int IDs for your rows as well as unique slugs, but join based on the ints. I would highly advise not shortening the length of an existing column, as you are apt to truncate existing data, losing referential integrity. If you've already done that, I hope you backed up the data beforehand so you can undo the change and restore it. –  Conspicuous Compiler Jan 31 '12 at 17:13
show 1 more comment

As Conspicuous Compiler noted, I would definitely have an index on your first table based on the company id and name (so the name part is optimized for the order by clause).

Although I too have not done anything with django, one other optimizing MySQL keyword is "STRAIGHT_JOIN" which tells the optimizer to do the query in the order you've told it to. ex:

SELECT STRAIGHT_JOIN * FROM ...

In both instances of your "Explain" queries, it for some reason is stuck on the fact of companyprofile being one record and may trying to use THAT as the basis of the join and working up the stack otherwise. By doing straight_join, you are telling MySQL you KNOW the primary table is "Inventory_CINodeInventory" and use it first... the other tables are more of a "lookup" or "reference" table of other simple elements you want also. I've seen just this one keyword take a query that wouldn't run completely (killed the task after 30 hours) going against gov't contracts data of over 14 million records to less than 2 hours ... NOTHING ELSE in the query changed, just this one KEYWORD. (but definitely include the other index if not already done so).

COMMENT per latest edits to question...

You mention the query is SLOW with the order by, but FAST without it. How many entries are actually being returned from the result set. Another tactic I've used before is to wrap the query as a select to just get the answer back, then apply the order to the OUTER results... Something like

select *
   from 
      ( select your Entire Query
           from ...
           Without The Order by clause 
      ) as FastResults
   order by
      FastResults.Name

This probably breaks out of the django auto-building your SQL statement, but worth a try for proof of concept. You already have a working syntax to run with, I would give this a shot.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried your tip, but it does not work... –  Eric Feb 2 '12 at 14:44
    
@Eric, updated with another option to try. –  DRapp Feb 2 '12 at 15:00
    
Good idea, but request is still slow. –  Eric Feb 3 '12 at 8:45
add comment

I noticed You are using:

ENGINE=MyISAM

Just a guess, but You could try to switch table engine to InnoDB. It is mutch faster if used with multiple joins queries.

ENGINE=InnoDB

InnoDB engine can't be used to perform Full Text Search, but there is big difference with overall performance.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have a source for the claim that InnoDB is faster with multiple JOIN queries? I know that it is faster for DBs which are fairly write heavy, but generally, an individual query from an unloaded DB will be slower with InnoDB, since it locks row-by-row vs. MyISAM which, for comparable queries, either doesn't lock at all or locks the whole table. –  Conspicuous Compiler Feb 6 '12 at 16:53
1  
Hmm, I shouldn't generalize. In certain cases it is faster: link. Overall index searching/comparison is faster in most cases: article and data. –  Meonester Feb 6 '12 at 21:15
    
Unfortunately, I already tried InnoDB : still using tmp table : slow –  Eric Feb 8 '12 at 0:24
add comment

You could try to use a view when you access your Data:

CREATE VIEW v AS SELECT *
FROM inventory_cinodeinventory
LEFT JOIN ci_cinodeclass ON ( inventory_cinodeinventory.ci_class_id = ci_cinodeclass.class_name )
LEFT JOIN accounts_companyprofile ON ( inventory_cinodeinventory.company_id = accounts_companyprofile.slug )
LEFT JOIN accounts_companysite ON ( inventory_cinodeinventory.company_site_id = accounts_companysite.slug )
LEFT JOIN accounts_companyprofile T5 ON ( accounts_companysite.company_id = T5.slug )
ORDER BY inventory_cinodeinventory.name ASC

The disadvantage here is that you have to write "pure sql" on the server. And you have to create a model for this new view.

Edit:
You could also create a view with the inner joins. That could also be faster than querying the table directly.

CREATE VIEW v AS SELECT *
FROM inventory_cinodeinventory
INNER JOIN ci_cinodeclass ON ( inventory_cinodeinventory.ci_class_id = ci_cinodeclass.class_name )
INNER JOIN accounts_companyprofile ON ( inventory_cinodeinventory.company_id = accounts_companyprofile.slug )
INNER JOIN accounts_companysite ON ( inventory_cinodeinventory.company_site_id = accounts_companysite.slug )
INNER JOIN accounts_companyprofile T5 ON ( accounts_companysite.company_id = T5.slug )
ORDER BY inventory_cinodeinventory.name ASC
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, left join is working much better, like I said in my question. I am just expecting using "inner join" working as fast as left join : but how...that is the question... –  Eric Feb 8 '12 at 0:37
    
My example was not about the "left join". It was about using a view and than querying the view directly. –  frugi Feb 8 '12 at 9:16
add comment

Make your join keys in int unsigned

and add inventory_cinodeinventory.ci_class_id > 0 (ci_class_id__gt = 0) (the same to the rest keys in joins) to where

It will point MySQL to your keys keeping it in django's ORM style

share|improve this answer
add comment

I've implemented fix for INNER JOIN for Django ORM, it will use STRAIGHT_JOIN in case of ordering with INNER JOINs. I talked to Django core-devs and we decided to do this as separate backend for now. So you can check it out here: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/django-mysql-fix

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.