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I know that the getName() function on the main thread will return the String main, but this can be changed with setName().

Is there any way to always determine the main thread of an application?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It seems that the main thread has an id of 1 as indicated by Thread.getId():

class test{
    public static boolean isMainThread(){
        return Thread.currentThread().getId() == 1;
    }

    public static void main(String[]args){
        System.out.println(isMainThread());
        new Thread( new Runnable(){
            public void run(){
                System.out.println(isMainThread());
            }
        }).start();
    }
}    

I'm not sure if it is part of the specification or an implementation-specific feature.

A more portable way is this:

class test{

    static long mainThreadId = Thread.currentThread().getId();

    public static boolean isMainThread(){
        return Thread.currentThread().getId() == mainThreadId;
    }

    public static void main(String[]args){
        System.out.println(isMainThread());
        new Thread( new Runnable(){
            public void run(){
                System.out.println(isMainThread());
            }
        }).start();
    }
}    

with the caveat that mainThreadId has to be either in a class that is loaded by the main thread (e.g. the class containing the main method). For instance, this doesn't work:

class AnotherClass{
    static long mainThreadId = Thread.currentThread().getId();

    public static boolean isMainThread(){
        return Thread.currentThread().getId() == mainThreadId;
    }
}
class test{
    public static void main(String[]args){
        //System.out.println(isMainThread());
        new Thread( new Runnable(){
            public void run(){
                System.out.println(AnotherClass.isMainThread());
            }
        }).start();
    }
}    
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3  
Nice one. I'm guessing this would be implementation specific though since the Thread storage structure isn't defined by the JVM specification. –  Jivings Jan 30 '12 at 11:41
    
Fair enough. On the plus side, this behavior appears as part of the source code for java.lang.Thread, so it's not a JVM internal. –  Vlad Jan 30 '12 at 11:46
    
I did not know of that method. It looks like your answer is correct then Vlad! Although the functionality could be overridden by the implementation it's reasonable to assume it wouldn't be! –  Jivings Jan 30 '12 at 11:50
    
@Vlad: What makes you think that the source code for java.lang.Thread is not implementation specific? –  jarnbjo Jan 30 '12 at 11:52
1  
@Jivings: No, it's never reasonable to assume that undocumented behaviour will not change or be consistent across different JavaVM implementations or versions. –  jarnbjo Jan 30 '12 at 11:55

One possibility is to call Thread.currentThread() at the start of main(), and hold on to the reference.

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Say for example I'm writing a framework, and I have a static method that I only want the main thread to be able to execute? –  Jivings Jan 30 '12 at 11:35
4  
Sounds to me like you've got a design issue ;-) If you MUST have this, I would simply document it (like most GUI frameworks document the fact that you can only make UI updates from the event dispatcher thread). –  dty Jan 30 '12 at 11:36
    
If you take a look at the Android API. Only the main thread/activity can perform UI changes I believe. Messages can be passed back to the main thread requesting it makes changes but if it's attempted by anything else then an exception is thrown. –  Jivings Jan 30 '12 at 11:38
    
@Jivings: If you situation is similar to GUI frameworks, your problem is slightly different from what you describe. You don't need to identify a main thread, you need to identify a thread that executes a particular piece of code (a message loop in the case of GUI frameworks). –  axtavt Jan 30 '12 at 11:59
    
@axtavt I assumed that would be the main thread, but perhaps not. –  Jivings Jan 30 '12 at 13:05

From your question and your responses to comments I would suggest the following 2 approaches:

  1. Place all requests to an event queue and main thread will take the requests from request queue to call the method you are talking about. In this case there must be a contract that any other method wanting to access the method you are talking about can do it only via the event queue (same idea as EDT).

  2. Place an extra parameter in the method that you want to be called by main only to act as a token.Inside the method check if the token is correct (only main will have it/know it).If it is correct then proceed.Otherwise return false. Of course if you are allowed to make such a modification

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Thanks, this seems to be a reasonable solution. –  Jivings Jan 30 '12 at 13:08

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