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I have a different git repository for my office and a different git repo for my hobby projects.

When I do git config --global user.name the user name changes globally and this creates a confusion of committing to a repo with user name.

Hence the question is how can i have the same username across all my hobby projects and the same username across the office projects. I use the same machine to work on both the places.

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marked as duplicate by Cupcake, Elliott Frisch, Code Lღver, Kris, Neil Lunn May 19 at 7:17

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2 Answers 2

up vote 35 down vote accepted

Just use --local instead of --global. In fact, local is the default so you can just do

git config user.email personal@example.org
git config user.name "whatf hobbyist"

in one repo, and

git config user.email work@example.com
git config user.name "whatf at work"

in another repo

The values will then be stored in in the .git/config for that repo rather than your global configuration file.

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shouldn't user.name contain the person's name, not email address? user.email contains the email address –  Jonathan Wakely Mar 7 '13 at 10:31
    
@JonathanWakely I think you're right. I'm not sure where I got the example to put both values in one setting. I've updated the answer. –  mikej Mar 7 '13 at 13:55
    
@mikej git commit --author= allows that syntax, but not setting through config or environment variables. –  Joe Mar 9 '13 at 4:48
    
Ah, cheers @Joe, that might be where I've used it in the past. –  mikej Mar 9 '13 at 16:13

Omit the --global from your call to git config:

git config user.name "A. U. Thor"

This will set the property in the current repository.

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