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I have used initialization lists a great deal in my C++ programs but wasn't aware that you could allocate memory within them.

So you can do something (as a contrived example) like this:

class Test
{
private:
    int* i;
    int* j;
    int count;
    int* k;

public:
    Test(void) : i(new int), j(new int[10]), count(10), k(new int[count])
    {
    }

    ~Test(void)
    {
        delete i;
        delete [] j;
        delete [] k;
    }
};

Are there any issues in doing memory allocation in this way? Regarding the order of initialization here is it safe to have a parameter initialized by one initialized in the same list? i.e. as I allocate count before I use it is it safe to use or is there some special initialization order I could fall foul of?

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1  
Note that the order of intialization is not determined by the ctor initializer but the declaration order of the variables. Also note that a proper answer possibly depends on whether you want your code to be exception safe in the presence of new throwing or not. –  PlasmaHH Jan 30 '12 at 13:07

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

It's not exception-safe. If the new for j throws an exception then the destructor for Test is not called, and so the memory for i is not freed.

The destructor of i is called if the initializer for j throws, it's just that a raw pointer has no destructor. So you could make it exception-safe by replacing i with a suitable smart pointer. In this case, unique_ptr<int> for i and unique_ptr<int[]> for j would do.

You can rely on the initializers to be executed in their correct order (the order the members are defined, not necessarily the order in the list). They can safely use data members that have already been initialized, so there's no problem with using count in the initializer for k.

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So specifically, this is a problem if the class calls new more than once in the initializer list. :) –  jalf Jan 30 '12 at 13:08
1  
@Firedragon - no, because you'd have no way to guarantee that your member variables are nil at time of creation, so you coulnd't judge which ones were already initialized. –  Kornel Kisielewicz Jan 30 '12 at 13:11
2  
@Firedragon: The easiest way to make it exception safe is to use smart pointers rather than raw pointers; this will also mean you don't need to write a destructor, or the copy constructor and copy-assignment operator that are missing from your class. Adding exception handlers is rather ugly, and a bit fiddly to get right. –  Mike Seymour Jan 30 '12 at 13:15
1  
@SteveJessop Maybe. You still have the body of the constructor to enforce the class invariants, cleaning up and throwing if they aren't met. –  James Kanze Jan 30 '12 at 14:13
1  
@MikeSeymour Smart pointers are one solution. Another that I've seen used is to push all of the pointers down into a private base class, whose constructor initializes them to NULL, and whose destructor deletes them (but the news are in the constructor body of the derived class). –  James Kanze Jan 30 '12 at 14:16

This code could leak memory in the presence of an initializer that throws an exception.

Note that this could be made to work correctly if the members of Test were smart -- rather than raw -- pointers.

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You are allocating memory in your initialiser-list; this is totally fine, but you are then assigning the pointers to that memory to raw pointers.

These raw pointers do not imply any sort of memory ownership or deletion of the pointers that they point to, and as a result, the code contains several memory leaks, does not follow the "Rule of Five", and is generally bad.

A far better way to write Test would be:

class Test
{
private:
    //Assuming you actually want dynamic memory allocation:
    std::unique_ptr<int> i;
    std::unique_ptr<int[]> j;
    int count;
    std::unique_ptr<int[]> k;

public:
    Test(void) : i(new int), j(new int[10]), count(10), k(new int[count])
    {
    }
};
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There's no problem with your initialization -- they are guaranteed by the standard to be done in order, however, do remember that if any of those allocations fails, the former ones won't be freed.

So the only downside is if you want to keep safe against a failed allocation -- then you'd rather want to initialize them to nil and in the constructor wrap the allocation up in a try block. That is usually not needed though, unless your application is in the real danger of running out of memory, and needs to recover from that.

Of course that holds true assuming that only a lack of memory can throw an exception -- if you allocate objects that can throw other exceptions, you should be more worried about it.

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"That is usually not needed though" - personally I do it anyway, since deciding whether it's needed or not tends not to be an exact science. Anyway doing it makes the code simpler, no need for a destructor. –  Steve Jessop Jan 30 '12 at 13:16
    
Out of memory isn't the only issue. Any exception in the constructor of later members will cause the same issues. And note that even if today none of the members throw, you probably don't want to manually review your whole code base if you add an exception to a type later in time. It is much easier to just solve the non issue now than expect an fragile solution to work. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 30 '12 at 13:18
    
@Steve, life would be prettier if everyone did that (and myself, I do not use raw pointer allocation anyway), but I just pointed out that for most people it's a non-issue. –  Kornel Kisielewicz Jan 30 '12 at 13:18
    
@David, true, but not in this particular case. I'll edit the answer though. –  Kornel Kisielewicz Jan 30 '12 at 13:19
    
@Kornel: fair enough, I'm just saying that I faintly disapprove of "most people" ;-) –  Steve Jessop Jan 30 '12 at 13:20

There's no specific issue with calling new from the initializer list.

However, if you do it for multiple members, it won't be exception-safe, and you risk leaking memory (what if the first new call succeeds, but the second throws an exception? Then the first allocation is leaked).

As for relying on the initialization order, that's perfectly safe. Members are initialized in the order in which they're listed in the class declaration. So you can use the value of members initialized early, to initialize "later" members.

Just keep in mind that it's their declaration order inside the class, and not their order in the initialization list that determines their initialization order. :)

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So am I right is saying that this would work, even though it looks odd and I believe many standards say you should do them in the order as in the class? Test(void) : k(new int[count]), count(10) –  Firedragon Jan 30 '12 at 13:12
1  
@Firedragon: Yes, as long as count and k stay in the correct order relative to each other in the class definition. –  Mankarse Jan 30 '12 at 13:14
1  
@Firedragon: yes, that would still work. GCC would warn for it, though, since it's confusing to read. –  Steve Jessop Jan 30 '12 at 13:15
    
Yeah, it would work. But you should only do it if you're actively trying to confuse the reader ;) –  jalf Jan 30 '12 at 14:15

Suppose that you have:

class Foo
{
public:
    T* p1;
    T* p2;

    Foo()
    : p1(new T),
      p2(new T)
    {
    }
};

If initializing p2 fails (either because new throws an out of memory exception or because the T constructor fails), then p1 will be leaked. To combat this, C++ allows using try/catch in initialization lists, but it's usually pretty gross.

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Steve Jessop's answer presents pitfalls.

About the order, which I think is what your question addressed:

12.6.2/4

Initialization shall proceed in the following order:

[...]

  • Then, nonstatic data members shall be initialized in the order they were declared in the class definition (again regardless of the order of the mem-initializers).

Since in your class, count is declared before k, you're ok.

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