Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
List<Object> listObj = new ArrayList<Object[]>();
listObj.add(new Object[]{1,"abc",new Date(21/1/2001)});
listObj.add(new Object[]{1,"abc",new Date(21/1/2001)});
listObj.add(new Object[]{2,"acc",new Date(21/1/2001)});
Set<Object[]> unique = new HashSet<Object[]>();
unique.addAll();

I´m expecting to get:

{1,abc,21/1/2001},{2,acc,21/1/2001}

Instead I get:

{1,abc,21/1/2001},{1,abc,(21/1/2001},{2,acc,21/1/2001}

How to find unique entries in this example?

share|improve this question
1  
HashSet has nothing to do with Comparable. It just uses hashCode and equals. –  Thomas Jungblut Jan 30 '12 at 13:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Arrays in Java don't have the concept of equality that would allow this to work. You need to define a custom class with a number, string and date and implement equals/hashCode yourself to allow this to work.

share|improve this answer
    
The above is the correct way to do this. However, you could also use a Map<String, Object[]> and use the Object[].toString() as the key. I believe this will work because the toString for arrays includes all the elements of the array (up to a point). This is a "smelly" solution and again, the "correct" one is the one stated above. –  John B Jan 30 '12 at 13:30

You can use a TreeSet initialized with a custom Comparator that does the check you need; there is no way for this work with arrays and the default comparator.

share|improve this answer

The easiest approach is to use a Set. I would strongly recommend creating a class to capture your int, string and date object

public class Foo {
    private int num;
    private String letters;
    private Date date;
}

Then you can override methods equals and hashCode to get expected behaviour from your set

share|improve this answer

I would encapsulate all data in the object array to a POJO.
In the POJO you can define your own equals method. e.g

public class Bean {
    private int i;
    private String l;
    private Date d;
    public int getI() {
        return i;
    }
    public void setI(int i) {
        this.i = i;
    }
    public String getL() {
        return l;
    }
    public void setL(String l) {
        this.l = l;
    }
    public Date getD() {
        return d;
    }
    public void setD(Date d) {
        this.d = d;
    }
    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result + ((d == null) ? 0 : d.hashCode());
        result = prime * result + i;
        result = prime * result + ((l == null) ? 0 : l.hashCode());
        return result;
    }
    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (this == obj)
            return true;
        if (obj == null)
            return false;
        if (!(obj instanceof Bean))
            return false;
        Bean other = (Bean) obj;
        if (d == null) {
            if (other.d != null)
                return false;
        } else if (!d.equals(other.d))
            return false;
        if (i != other.i)
            return false;
        if (l == null) {
            if (other.l != null)
                return false;
        } else if (!l.equals(other.l))
            return false;
        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Arrays in Java do not override hashCode() and equals() thus comparing two arrays with the same contents (with the same length and equal elements) unexpectedly yields false.

If you use List<Object>, it should work fine. You can take advantage of Arrays.asList() utility.

share|improve this answer

You could implement a thin wrapper around Object[] that would provide appropriate hashCode() and equals(). The two methods can very easily be implemented in terms of Arrays.deepHashCode() and Arrays.deepEquals():

public class Cmp {

    public static class ObjArray {
        private final Object[] arr;
        public ObjArray(Object[] arr) {
            this.arr = arr;
        }
        @Override
        public int hashCode() {
            return Arrays.deepHashCode(arr);
        }
        @Override
        public boolean equals(Object obj) {
            if (this == obj)
                return true;
            if (obj == null)
                return false;
            if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
                return false;
            ObjArray other = (ObjArray)obj;
            return Arrays.deepEquals(arr, other.arr);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        List<ObjArray> listObj = new ArrayList<ObjArray>();
        listObj.add(new ObjArray(new Object[]{1,"abc",new Date(21/1/2001)}));
        listObj.add(new ObjArray(new Object[]{1,"abc",new Date(21/1/2001)}));
        listObj.add(new ObjArray(new Object[]{2,"acc",new Date(21/1/2001)}));
        Set<ObjArray> unique = new HashSet<ObjArray>();
        unique.addAll(listObj);
        System.out.println(unique);
    }


}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.