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I have a UserControl that displays some text of a DP of the UserControl. For this a converter is used. I understand that the culture parameter is the "en-US" culture, unless you specify a different culture in the ConverterCulture value of the binding or the xml:lang attribute.

But how can I change to culture from outside of the UserControl???

This is my UserControl:

<UserControl x:Class="CultInfoConverter.MyUserControl"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:my="clr-namespace:CultInfoConverter"
    DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}" 
    Tag="{x:Null}">
    <UserControl.Resources>
        <my:MyConverter x:Key="MyConverter" />
    </UserControl.Resources>
    <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" >
        <TextBlock Margin="8">My converter culture is</TextBlock>
        <TextBlock FontWeight="Bold" Text="{Binding Tag, Converter={StaticResource MyConverter}}" />
    </StackPanel>
</UserControl>

For demonstration purposes the converter simply returns the name of the culture info passed to it:

public class MyConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return culture.Name;
    }
    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

In my window I have two instances of the user control, and each should display a different culture. But both just show the standard "en-US".

<Window x:Class="CultInfoConverter.Window1"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300"
    xmlns:my="clr-namespace:CultInfoConverter">
    <StackPanel>
        <TextBlock Margin="8">using xml:lang="de-DE"</TextBlock>
        <my:MyUserControl xml:lang="de-DE"/>
        <TextBlock Margin="8">using xml:lang="fr-FR"</TextBlock>
        <my:MyUserControl xml:lang="fr-FR"/>
    </StackPanel>
</Window>
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The reason why your example doesn't work is that you're setting the xml:lang property after MyUserObject has already been constructed. The TextBlock (and Binding, and Converter) have already been created w/the default language, that is, en-US.

TheDuke is incorrect about multiple xml:lang attributes. While it's true you only have 1 UI thread, and it does only have 1 culture, each FrameworkElements is allowed it's own xml:lang. To test this out, set your xml:lang attribute in your MyUserControl XAML (in your first code listing) to de-DE. You should see de-DE now appearing twice in bold.

To solve the problem, you have to set up the DataBinding AFTER MyUserControl has been constructed and the Language/xml:lang attribute has been set. I did a quick test by adding the DataBinding in MyUserControl's Loaded event. This gives you the results I think you're expecting (de-DE in the first line, fr-Fr in the second).

alt text

MyControl XAML Listing:

<UserControl
    x:Class="WPFCultureTester.MyUserControl"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WPFCultureTester"
    DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}"
    Tag="{x:Null}"
    Loaded="UserControl_Loaded">
    <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" >
        <TextBlock Margin="8">My converter culture is</TextBlock>
        <TextBlock x:Name="foo" FontWeight="Bold" />
    </StackPanel>
</UserControl>

MyControl Code-Behind:

using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Data;

namespace WPFCultureTester
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Interaction logic for MyUserControl.xaml
    /// </summary>
    public partial class MyUserControl : UserControl
    {
    	public MyUserControl()
    	{
    		InitializeComponent();
    	}

    	private void UserControl_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    	{
    		this.foo.SetBinding(
    			TextBlock.TextProperty,
    			new Binding("") { Converter = CultInfoConverter.Converter });
    	}
    }
}

BTW, I took the liberty of adding a singleton Converter to CultInfoConverter, and renaming some namespaces, so you may have to change it back if you're doing a straight cut/paste.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks micahtan! Your solution exactly fits my requirements. Sorry for the late reply. I've been to "nb-NO" for a couple days. – miasbeck Jun 10 '09 at 4:40

I'm not an expert at globalisation, in fact I don't think I've ever tried it, but hope this helps.

Here's my UserControl.xaml

<UserControl x:Class="Tab_Question.UserControl1"
xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
Height="30">
<Grid>
	<TextBlock Text="{Binding Path=CultureName, FallbackValue=bindingError}" />
</Grid>

Heres the code behind UserControl.cs

    public partial class UserControl1 : UserControl
{
	public static DependencyProperty CultureStringProperty =
		DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("Culture", typeof(String), typeof(UserControl1));

	public static DependencyProperty CultureNameProperty =
		DependencyProperty.Register("CultureName", typeof(String), typeof(UserControl1));

	public String CultureString
	{
		get
		{
			return (String)GetValue(UserControl1.CultureStringProperty);
		}
		set
		{
			if (CultureString != value)
			{
				SetValue(UserControl1.CultureStringProperty, value);
				DoSomethingWithCulture();
			}
		}
	}

	private void DoSomethingWithCulture()
	{
		// Good to continue
		CultureInfo newCulture = CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo(CultureString);
		SetValue(UserControl1.CultureNameProperty, newCulture.Name);
	}

	public UserControl1()
	{
		InitializeComponent();
		this.DataContext = this;
	}
}

And finally heres the Window.xaml

<Window
x:Class="Tab_Question.Window1"
xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
xmlns:local="clr-namespace:Tab_Question"
Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300">
<StackPanel>
	<local:UserControl1 CultureString="en-us" />
	<local:UserControl1 CultureString="en-gb" />
</StackPanel>

I'll try and explain what I've done, hope it answers the question.

I've setup an attached DependencyProperty on the UserControl that allows you to pass a CultureInfo String to the UserControl when the String is updated the UserControl creates a CultureInfo object that you can store in a member variable, and updates the CultureName DependancyProperty that the TextBlock in the UserControl binds to.

I'm not sure why setting the XmlLang attribute you tried doesn't work but suspect it has something to do with the UI thread only able to have one language.

I know this doesn't match the sample code you provided, but I hope it provides you with a starting ground to modify and adapt.

Ben

share|improve this answer
    
Well, this sort of helps, but I would like to use different cultures for the Converter objects used in my UserControl. I could pass the user control itself as the converter parameter and then get the DP from it in the ConvertTo-function. But I would rather not use any converter parameters. – miasbeck May 25 '09 at 13:55
    
<TextBlock Text="{Binding Path=CultureName, Converter={StaticResource TestConverter}, ConverterCulture={x:Static local:UserControl1.CultureName}}" /> If you can figure a way to store the CultureInfo in a static Member variable, then you co9uld use this to supply a different culture to the converter. – TheDuke May 25 '09 at 17:56
    
@micahtan: Thanks for clearing that up, can't comment on your post yet. – TheDuke Jun 9 '09 at 14:41

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