Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Struggling with this one.

I have set up a basic email/enquiry form for a client using Wordpress (Fast secure contact form - Mike Challis, which I've used before with no problem).

I tested it with various emails - got others to test - All fine.

Passed on to client for approval and his email address (two of them) create the error: Illegal characters in POST. Possible email injection attempt

One is a BT email the other is Gmail. I have tested again with BT and Gmail all fine for my addresses - I try his again and the same error.

I did have the account password protected while testing so disabled that to see if that was the problem but makes no difference.

There's quite a bit of code so I won't paste it yet as someone my know instantly why this would be.

My original form had some customisations (only visual) but even when going back the simplest new install of the plugin, same error - only with clients email addresses. Embarrassing.

Would really appreciate your hunches.

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Without seeing the code or the email addresses in question, no way to tell. –  Marc B Jan 30 '12 at 14:47
    
Hi. I don't really want to post the clients email - sure you understand. It's bizarre that it is only his that fail. –  Dave Jan 30 '12 at 14:57
    
What's spitting out the error? Could his server have mod_security or equivalent running? It might be something completely OTHER than wordpress doing this. –  Marc B Jan 30 '12 at 14:59
    
Your Gmail address works fine, but your clients Gmail address doesn't? That's odd. Does the user name part contain any characters that are not digits, letters (a-z) and optionally a dot(.)? –  Arjan Jan 30 '12 at 15:07
    
The only place I can find a reference within the plugin is in this section: foreach($_POST as $k => $v){ if (is_string($v)){ $v = strtolower($v); $v = str_replace('donkey','',$v); // fixes invalid input with "donkey" in string $v = str_replace('monkey','',$v); // fixes invalid input with "monkey" in string if( preg_match($input_expl, $v) ){ return __('Illegal characters in POST. Possible email injection attempt', 'si-contact-form'); } } } –  Dave Jan 30 '12 at 15:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've found this code in the plugin (line 1433 and onwards in the latest wordpress plugin version):

// check posted input for email injection attempts
// Check for these common exploits
// if you edit any of these do not break the syntax of the regex
$input_expl = "/(content-type|mime-version|content-transfer-encoding|to:|bcc:|cc:|document.cookie|document.write|onmouse|onkey|onclick|onload)/i";
// Loop through each POST'ed value and test if it contains one of the exploits fromn $input_expl:
foreach($_POST as $k => $v){
    if (is_string($v)){
        $v = strtolower($v);
        $v = str_replace('donkey','',$v); // fixes invalid input with "donkey" in string
        $v = str_replace('monkey','',$v); // fixes invalid input with "monkey" in string
        if( preg_match($input_expl, $v) ){
            return __('Illegal characters in POST. Possible email injection attempt', 'si-contact-form');
        }
    }
}

The error occurs when at least one of the posted fields contain an 'invalid' value anywhere in the string. The most likely candidates that trigger this error on email addresses would seem to be onmouse, onkey, onclick, and onload. (Note that the words 'donkey' and 'monkey' are allowed.) You should check the value of $v just before the return statement so you can determine which section causes the error, then you can decide how to solve the problem.

        if( preg_match($input_expl, $v) ){
            var_dump($v); exit(); // <-- add this for testing
            return __('Illegal characters in POST. Possible email injection attempt', 'si-contact-form');
        }
share|improve this answer
    
I could buy you a big pint of beer! Ok so if my clients name by some AMAZING law if fate was irish and - no kidding 'Mcconkey' that might cause a little problem! –  Dave Jan 30 '12 at 15:52
    
Thank you Arjan. What a relief! –  Dave Jan 30 '12 at 16:11
    
The best solution would be to replace |onkey| with |\bonkey| so it only matches onkey at the beginning of a word, not in the middle. That means McConkey is safe. And maybe you should inform Mike Challis too, so he can fix it for coming versions. –  Arjan Jan 30 '12 at 16:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.