Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm a Rails beginner (and loving it so far). I'm not sure if this is a stupid question. As far as I know, a foreign key, for example, like this: user_id in a model called Micropost will associate a micropost with the ID of an User model. Like this:

enter image description here

railtutorial.org

So you can do this: <%= micropost.user_id %> to get the ID of the user who created a micropost.

But can also do this: <%= micropost.user.id %> due to Rails' ability to associate models via has_many and belongs_to.

  • So I wonder, why are foreign keys necessary in Rails applications if the web framework can access other model's attributes through associations anyways?
  • Is it necessary to index them and improve database performance?
  • Or are they necessary so that something like this: micropost.user.username can work?
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

Foreign keys are used under the hood to make Rails associations work, and those associations wouldn't work without them. You can see this by attaching .to_sql to a Relation, e.g.:

> Blog.first.articles.to_sql
=> "SELECT `articles`.* FROM `articles`  WHERE `articles`.`blog_id` = 42"

In this case it's using the blog_id foreign key to query the articles association.

It isn't necessary to index foreign keys, but it is a good idea and gives better performance.

share|improve this answer

So I wonder, why are foreign keys necessary in Rails applications if the web framework can access other model's attributes through associations anyways?

Foreign keys (along with the Primary key counter part) are what links the models together. If you did not have a user_id how would you know which user it ultimately is associated to?

Is it necessary to index them and improve database performance?

I find this practice helpful, in regards to performance.

Or are they necessary so that something like this: micropost.user.username can work?

It's only necessary in the context that to find micropost's associated user you need to know which user it is.

share|improve this answer

The key thing to understand about user vs user_id in your model is that user_id is the foreign key and that user is an instance of a User (eg, it's the model object).

Without user_id, rails can't make the correct user for you.

Note that if you are not preloading your associations, if all you need is the user id (say, for a building a URL), using micropost.user_id will be faster than micropost.user.id because rails won't need to instantiate the User object just to retrieve the id.

share|improve this answer

By calling micropost.user_id, Rails gives you the entry of the user_id column of the microposts table. By calling micropost.user.id, Rails takes the user_id column from micropost and "searches" for Users with the corresponding id. When you do not have the user_id, Rails do not know anything about the correlation between the two tables.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.