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I have a TCP connection that is open continuously for communication with an external device. There is a lot going on in the communication pipe which causes the UI to become unresponsive at times.

I would like to put the communication on a separate thread. I understand detachNewThread and how it calls a @selector. My issue is that I am not sure how this would be used in conjunction with something like NSStream?

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1 Answer 1

Rather than manually creating a thread and managing thread safety issues, you might prefer to use Grand Central Dispatch ('GCD'). That allows you to post blocks — which are packets of code and some state — off to be executed away from the main thread and wherever the OS thinks is most appropriate. If you create a serial dispatch queue you can even be certain that if you post a new block while an old one has yet to finish, the system will wait until it finishes.

E.g.

// you'd want to make this an instance variable in a real program
dispatch_queue_t serialDispatchQueue = 
            dispatch_queue_create(
                       "A handy label for debugging",
                       DISPATCH_QUEUE_SERIAL);

...

dispatch_async(serialDispatchQueue,
^{
    NSLog(@"all code in here occurs on the dispatch queue ...");
});

/* lots of other things here */

dispatch_async(serialDispatchQueue,
^{
    NSLog(@"... and this won't happen until after everything already dispatched");
});

...

// cleanup, for when you're done
dispatch_release(serialDispatchQueue);

A very quick introduction to GCD is here, Apple's more thorough introduction is also worth reading.

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Ok, I still am a bit confused. The GCD approach still executes a specific bit of code. To move NSStream to the background using GCD should I allocate and init the object wrapping the NSStream inside the dispatch_async? –  user1178361 Jan 30 '12 at 22:24
1  
I think Tommy suggests that you hand the specific NSStream events (delegate callbacks) over to GCD as blocks. As Tommy writes, if you create a serial dispatch queue, GCD will make sure that a new block is not executed before the previous block has finished executing. –  Bart Jacobs Apr 19 '12 at 13:15

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