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I'm having a fundamental problem with how the lapply function works. I want to classify each member of each vector in a list.

My list:

s <- list(
  a = c(1, 20, 300), 
  b = c(1.1, 20.1, 300.1), 
  c = c(1.2, 20.2, 300.3)
)

My classification function:

classify <- function(n, peaks){
  which(abs(peaks-n)==min(abs(peaks-n)))
}

My peaks:

peaks <- c(1.27350, 20.32662, 300.02650)

If I classify s$c by itself, I get the result I expect:

> sapply(s$c,classify,peaks)
[1] 1 2 3

But when I try to classify all the vectors at once, I get this:

> lapply(s,classify,peaks)
$a
[1] 3 //should be 1,2,3

$b
[1] 3 //should be 1,2,3

$c 
[1] 1 //should be 1,2,3

Why am I getting the result that I do? And how do I get the result that I want?

share|improve this question
    
Richie has some good comments. I'm still struggling to understand why 1,2,3 is the result you expect. Is classify intended to accept vectors for both n and peaks? –  joran Jan 30 '12 at 16:24
    
n should just be a number. I had thought that lapply(s,classify,peaks) would work as I wished because s<-lapply(s_as_text, as.integer) "numericized" s_as_text to s. –  dnagirl Jan 30 '12 at 17:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, a style point: usewhich.min for finding the location of a minimum.

classify <- function(n, peaks){
  which.min(abs(peaks-n))
}

Second, break your code down a bit do see what is happening.

abs(peaks - s$a)   #3rd value is smallest
abs(peaks - s$b)   #3rd value is smallest
abs(peaks - s$c)   #1st value is smallest

These indicies are what gets returned from the call to lapply.


Based on your comment, I guess your problem is that lapply acts on each element of a vector, when you really want to call just call it once on everything, since classify is already vectorised. Try this:

if(is.list(s)) lapply(s, classify, peaks = peaks) else classify(s, peaks)
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the style point. So, for the second point, the issue is that my function needs to treat a vector differently. So when writing functions for processing lists, what sort of sanity checks are usually done on the input? –  dnagirl Jan 30 '12 at 17:43
    
@dnagirl: I think the sanity check you want is just is.list(s). See my updated answer. –  Richie Cotton Jan 31 '12 at 9:54

how bout

> lapply(s,sapply,classify,peaks)
$a
[1] 1 2 3

$b
[1] 1 2 3

$c
[1] 1 2 3
share|improve this answer

lapply(s, function(x) classify(x, peaks)) will pass each element of the list s as n in the function classify. lapply(s, classify, peaks) passes peaks as n to classify.

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