Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am doing a home work question to split a string without using the framework method.

Following is the working code I came up with.

I would like to know how can I improve the running time to O(n)?

Also any suggestions on improvement are welcome.

public static string[] split(string txt, char[] delim)
{
    char[] text = txt.ToCharArray();
    string[] result = new string[0];
    int count = 0;
    int i = 0;
    StringBuilder buff = new StringBuilder(); 
    while(i < text.Length)
    {
        bool found = false;
        foreach(char del in delim)
        {
            if(del == txt[i])
            {
                found = true;
                break;
            }
        }
        if(found)
        {
            count++;
            Array.Resize(ref result, count);
            result[count - 1] = buff.ToString();
            buff = new StringBuilder();                 
        }
        else
        {
            buff.Append(txt[i]);
        }

        i++;
    }

    if(buff.Length != 0)
    {
        count++;
        Array.Resize(ref result, count);
        result[count - 1] = buff.ToString();
    }

    return(result);
}
share|improve this question
    
are you allowed to use regex? –  Robin Van Persi Jan 30 '12 at 16:28
    
no, I am not allowed. It should be 'C'ish! –  Nemo Jan 30 '12 at 16:29
    
@Nemo are you sure the delimiter is an array of chars and not just ONE char? –  davioooh Jan 30 '12 at 16:34
1  
How C'ish should it be? For example - foreach is C#, not C'ish. –  Bertie Jan 30 '12 at 16:36
1  
@Dialecticus if(buff.Length != 0) outside the loop is for writing the outstanding buffer to result. –  Nemo Jan 30 '12 at 16:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I have a few changes that will simultaneously make this function more C like and reduce the run time to O(n):

1) Instead of dynamically resizing your result array lots of times, you should create it with enough spots to hold the maximum number of strings (you know that number is less than txt.Length) and then resize it just once at the very end before returning it.

2) Instead of assembling your results with a StringBuilder, make a char[] buff of length txt.Length and an index variable j and do buff[j++] = txt[i].

I think your function should be O(N) after you do that. Well technically it will be O(N*M) where M is the number of delimiters.

EDIT 1:

Here is a change that will make it be O(N)+O(M) instead of O(N*M):

Instead of looping through the delimiters for each character in the string, you should loop through the delimiters in ADVANCE and set up an array like this:

bool[] isDelimiter = new bool[128];  // increase size if you are allowing non-ascii
foreach(char delim in isDelimiter)
{
    isDelimiter[(int)char] = true;
}

Then you can just use this array to test each character of string in constant time.

share|improve this answer

I think your professor is looking for an API that takes only a single character, not an array. Not an array of characters. What I mean by this is if your delimiting string is "abcd", you will not be splitting on all instances of 'a','b','c','d'. You will only split if you find the whole string.

Your current algorithm is not O(n) because for each element in the input array you are comparing it against each element of the delimiting array. This leads to an O(n*m) execution time.

I do not think it is possible to convert this down to O(n) because every element on the input needs to be compared to every element of the delimiter array. I think it's probably more likely your professor is asking a different question in regards to the delimiter array.

public static String[] Split(String input, String delimiter)
{
    List<String> parts = new List<String>();
    StringBuilder buff = new StringBuilder();
    if (delimiter.Length > 1) //you are splitting on a string not a character
    {
       //perform string searching algorithm here
    }
    else if(delimiter.Length == 0)
    {
       throw new InvalidOperationException("Invalid delimiter.");
    }
    else //you are splitting on a character
    {
       char delimChar = delimiter[0];
       for (int i = 0; i < input.Length; i++)
       {
           if (input[i] == delimChar)
           {
               parts.Add(buff.ToString());
               buff.Clear();
           }
           else
           {
               buff.Append(input[i]);
           }
       }
    }
    return parts.ToArray();
}

C#'s String.Split() does take in an array of delimiters, but I do not believe that it does the splitting in O(n) time.

If you are looking into String search algorithms, these may be of assistance. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/String_searching_algorithm

edit: I incorrectly alluded to that fact that C#'s String.Split() API did not take an array of delimiters.

share|improve this answer
    
The documentation would seem to disagree with you on what delimiters the c# method takes : msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b873y76a.aspx. –  Bertie Jan 30 '12 at 16:56
    
This is not true. See String.Split Method on MSDN. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 30 '12 at 17:01
    
You guys are correct. However, I do not think that the more advanced usage of the C# API completes in O(n) execution time with multiple delimiters. I've updated my answer to reflect this. Thanks for pointing it out. –  Jim Jan 30 '12 at 18:42

You can make it O(n) if you put the delimiter characters into a HashSet. Testing for the existence of a value in a HashSet is O(1).

var delimterSet = new HashSet<char>(delim);

...

if(delimterSet.Contains(txt[i]) { ... }

However, for a small number of delimiters this will not improve the performance.

share|improve this answer
    
The OP says the solution has to be C'ish, so use a bool[] instead. Also I really doubt that HashSets have constant lookup time for all number of elements. How does that work? –  David Grayson Jan 30 '12 at 17:17
    
See SO question Can hash tables really be O(1) –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 30 '12 at 17:28

It is not possible to do String.Split in O(n) since the delimiter list has to be traversed/searched.

share|improve this answer
1  
Is this right? Wouldn't the first pass be O(n) and then the 2nd pass be O(n) as well? IIRC, O(2n)=O(n), but it's been a while, so I may be wrong. –  Michael Jan 30 '12 at 18:22

Maybe you can try doing all the work in one time

public static String[] Split(String txt, char[] delim)
{
    if (txt == null)
        return new String[0]; // or exception
    if (delim == null || delim.Length == 0)
        return new String[0]; // or exception

    char[] text = txt.ToCharArray();
    string[] result = new string[1]; // If there is no delimiter in the string, return the whole string
    int part = 0;
    int itemInArray = 1;

    for (int i = 0; i < text.Length; i++)
    {
        if (IsIn(delim, text[i]))
        {
            Array.Resize(ref result, ++itemInArray); // Is it consider as a framework method ???
            part++;
        }
        else
            result[part] += text[i];
    }
    return result;
}
public static Boolean IsIn(char[] delim, char c)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < delim.Length; i++)
        if (c == delim[i])
            return true;
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.