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So I am using Jquery mobile with great success except for one issue. Now every time a dynamic content page is navigated to by a user no matter what content displays, there is always a button at the bottom that when clicked emails the content to the address specified; works great. Now the first time a page is loaded, the click fires the event once. On the second visit its fired twice, third 3 times, etc. you get the point. I've scoured the net and implement every fix I could come across, such as using "pagecreate" instead of "pageinit", binding, unbinding, removing the div, turning off caching in the DOM but nothing works. The only success I've had is using .one() on the click but it needs to be fired if clicked again. Here is the structure. I have to .js files that load each with this to start

$( "#page" ).live( "pageinit", function() { 

Now I had the email function and other stuff in one file, but it makes it easier to separate them and I heard it does not matter. Now, here is the email function called in the pageinit

$('.eb').live('click', function() {
        var id = $('.eb').attr('id');
        var to = $('#recipient').val();
        var message = $('#email').html();

        var atpos = to.indexOf("@");
        var dotpos = to.lastIndexOf(".");
        if (atpos < 1 || dotpos < atpos + 2 || dotpos + 2 >= to.length) {
            alert('Please enter a valid email address!');
            return false;
        } 

        if(to.length == 0) {
            alert('Please enter a valid email address!');
            return false;
        } 

        $.mobile.showPageLoadingMsg();

        $.post('./services/service.email.php', { id: id, to: to, message: message}, function(data) {
            if(data.success == true) {
                $.mobile.hidePageLoadingMsg();
                alert('Your recipe has been sent!');
                $('#recipient').val('');
                return true;
            } 

            if(data.success == false) {
                if(data.fail == 1) {
                    alert('An error has occured sending your recipe. Try again soon!');
                    return false;
                }

                if(data.fail == 2) {
                    alert('Please enter a valid email address!');
                }
            }
        }, 'json');
            return false;
    }); 

Everything works flawlessly except the incremental firing of the .click on each new page. Can anyone lead me in the right direction?

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4 Answers 4

As of jQuery 1.7, the .live() method is deprecated. Use .on() to attach event handlers.

If you are using 1.7+ try to unbind the click event using .off() first.

$('.eb').off('click').on('click', function() {
 // ...
}); 

if you have to use .live() you can unbind the events with .die()

$('.eb').die('click').live('click', function() {
 // ...
});

or better use .delegate() and .undelegate() un the parent element:

$(document).undelegate('.eb', 'click').delegate('.eb', 'click', function() {
 // ...
});
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jQuery Mobile still ships with jQuery Core 1.6.4, which doesn't have .on(), but .delegate() is still preferred over .live(). –  Jasper Jan 30 '12 at 17:35
    
i've edited my answer and added an example for .delegate() –  Ingemar Jan 30 '12 at 17:45
    
Ok, a couple issues. 1) $('.eb').on('click' is not the same as using .live(), $(document).on('click', '.eb', function () {...}) is the same as .live(). The way you're using .on() it's the same as .bind(). 2) Also in jQuery Mobile you generally delegate events from the document element because it is the only element guaranteed to be in the DOM at any point-in-time. –  Jasper Jan 30 '12 at 17:48
    
Thanks for the examples; great solution! –  veeTrain Jun 21 '12 at 15:24
    
I used .die and it worked like a charm. Thank you sir. Undelegate might work too, but I would like to say DIE to any bugs that pester me :) –  Vishal Kumar Jul 12 '12 at 15:09
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Simply move the click event handler code outside of the pageinit event handler code like this:

$( document ).delegate( "#page", "pageinit", function() {


});
$(document).delegate('.eb', 'click', function() {
        var id = $('.eb').attr('id');
        var to = $('#recipient').val();
        var message = $('#email').html();

        var atpos = to.indexOf("@");
        var dotpos = to.lastIndexOf(".");
        if (atpos < 1 || dotpos < atpos + 2 || dotpos + 2 >= to.length) {
            alert('Please enter a valid email address!');
            return false;
        } 

        if(to.length == 0) {
            alert('Please enter a valid email address!');
            return false;
        } 

        $.mobile.showPageLoadingMsg();

        $.post('./services/service.email.php', { id: id, to: to, message: message}, function(data) {
            if(data.success == true) {
                $.mobile.hidePageLoadingMsg();
                alert('Your recipe has been sent!');
                $('#recipient').val('');
                return true;
            } 

            if(data.success == false) {
                if(data.fail == 1) {
                    alert('An error has occured sending your recipe. Try again soon!');
                    return false;
                }

                if(data.fail == 2) {
                    alert('Please enter a valid email address!');
                }
            }
        }, 'json');
            return false;
    }); 

When you use event delegation you don't want to bind inside another event handler, because each time that event handler fires you will be re-binding (and when you delegate event handlers they are delegated for the life of the DOM).

You can also use .bind() instead of .live() (this is my preferred method):

$( document ).delegate( "#page", "pageinit", function() {
    $('.eb').bind('click', ...);
});

You will notice that both of my examples change-out .live() for .delegate() as it performs slightly faster even when delegating from the document element. .delegate()s real strength is that you can choose the root element rather than having to bind to the document element: http://api.jquery.com/delegate

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I have tried both as well as Ingemar solution and both prevent the multple fires which is fantastic. The problem is the behavior is so sporadic I don't understand. I click it if fires, click it again nothing, click it 3 more times it fire, click it once it fires..etc, That is odd behavior. –  Naterade Jan 30 '12 at 17:48
    
The code above won't trigger any multiple fires and if it is placed in the global scope it should be available to every click event that is fired on the .eb elements. If you are still having problems then maybe you posted my fix in the wrong scope or have an error elsewhere in your code. To check for errors open your delevoper console (almost always F+12). –  Jasper Jan 30 '12 at 17:51
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I solved this by realizing the issue was with the div itself, #page. This page was loaded with dynamic content but the id never did, so somewhere along the line it cached somewhere and was fired incrementally on each new visit by one. I just added some PHP code to create a unique div id on each page load.

<?php $id = uniqid() ?>
<div id="<?php echo $id; ?>">CONTENT</div>

This solved the problem and it fires only once no matter how may page reloads there are.

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3  
This process is leaving behind all kinds of event bindings that aren't necessary (the further into your site users get, the slower it will perform because you're just loading more and more delegated event handlers that have to be checked whenever an event bubbles up the DOM). Your problem was a regular pitfall of working with dynamic content, you were being too liberal with your event bindings. The real fix is to stop using delegated event handlers where they aren't necessary. I'm glad you figured something out but this isn't a good answer. –  Jasper Aug 1 '12 at 20:03
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If you suspect that a form (for instance a popup form) is creating multiple pages when you submit try adding data-ajax="false" to the form element of each form. This solved my problem.

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