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I have defined 2 signatures and 2 modules as follows. One signature is derived from another; one module is derived from another.

module type MATRIX =
sig
  type 'a t
  ...
end

module type AMATRIX = 
sig
  include MATRIX
  ...
end

module MatrixArray : MATRIX =
struct
  type 'a t = 'a array array
  ...
end

module AMatrixArray : AMATRIX =
struct
  include MatrixArray
  let init (x: 'a) : 'a t =
    Array.make 2 (Array.make 2 x)
  ...
end

But when I compile this, it gives me an error in the end Error: This expression has type 'a array array but an expression was expected of type 'a t = 'a MatrixArray.t.

Does anyone know how I could keep this inheritance and make the type 'a t = 'a array array recognized?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Actually, MatrixArray is slightly more than just a MATRIX : it's a MATRIX where the implementation of type t is known to be an array. So you can write :

module MatrixArray : MATRIX with type 'a t = 'a array array =
struct
  type 'a t = 'a array array
  ...
end

This way, you keep the MATRIX constraint and can detect type errors, as well as keep information about what the type actually is - assuming, of course, that you care about making the type public instead of abstract.

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In the code:

module MatrixArray : MATRIX = struct
  type 'a t = 'a array array
 ...
end

You force MatrixArray to hide the definition of 'a t. One way to solve your problem is to remove the signature constraint:

module MatrixArray = struct
  type 'a t = 'a array array
 ...
end

You can later replace MatrixArray with (MatrixArray : MATRIX) when you want to abstract the type t.

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In this case, the type of MatrixArray is no more MATRIX, I can't use MATRIX to constraint MatrixArray any more... it will be a pity, no? –  SoftTimur Jan 30 '12 at 19:29
    
you can still use MATRIX to constraint MatrixArray later. You just write (MatrixArray : MATRIX) instead of simply MatrixArray where you need t to be abstract –  Thomas Jan 30 '12 at 19:37
    
I don't think so... If I write (MatrixArray : MATRIX) after the declaration of MatrixArray, and recompile the code, it still stops at the function init, and gives the same error... –  SoftTimur Jan 30 '12 at 19:47
2  
Of course, because if you write include (MatrixArray : MATRIX), then you still abstract the type t. In this case you don't want t to be abstract as you are calling Array.make functions. So in this case, just keep include MatrixArray. If you really want to keep t abstract, then you need to export a constructor (which will work for any type t) in MATRIX and call that abstract constructor in init. –  Thomas Jan 30 '12 at 20:01

Be careful with putting too much abstraction: it is nice to hide types (i.e. to use abstract types), but the OCaml compiler uses manifest types to perform some optimizations. Abstracting types will prevent the compiler from performing them.

One example, that might be interesting in your case, is that OCaml has two representations of arrays : standard arrays, and flat arrays of floats. If the compiler knows the type of the elements in an array, it can directly access the array using the correct representation. But if types of the elements are abstract, the compiler will add a test to choose between the two representations.

If you are working with matrices of floats, you should keep the types manifest, so that the compiler will generate the most efficient code when accessing these arrays.

An example:

let init_array t x =
  for i = 0 to Array.length t - 1 do
    t.(i) <- x
  done

is much slower (in native code) than

let init_float_array t (x : float) =
  for i = 0 to Array.length t - 1 do
    t.(i) <- x
  done

because init_array is polymorphic and init_float_array is monomorphic on float arrays.

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