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I'm trying to write a file system iterator as a simple Windows Application. I will post what I have so. The problem is that when I select the "C:\" for iteration the app locks up. If I select a directory from say My Documents it works just fine. What am I doing wrong? The overall goal is to write the results of the iteration to csv file. If you could help with that also I would very much appreciate it.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.IO;


namespace FileIterator
{
    class Iterator
    {

    public class MyItem
    {
        public static string it { get; set; }
    }

    public class Record
    {
        public long fileSize { get; set; }
        public string fileName { get; set; }

    }

    static List<Record> fileList = new List<Record>();

    public static void Iterate(string dir_tree)
    {
        Stack<string> dirs = new Stack<string>(20);

        if (!Directory.Exists(dir_tree))
        {
            MessageBox.Show("The directory you selected does not exist.", "Directory Selection Error",
            MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Exclamation);
        }
        dirs.Push(dir_tree);

        while (dirs.Count > 0)
        {
            string currentDir = dirs.Pop();
            string[] subDirs;
            try
            {
                subDirs = Directory.GetDirectories(currentDir);
            }

            catch (UnauthorizedAccessException)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("You do not have permission to access this folder", "Directory Permission Error",
                    MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Exclamation);
                continue;
            }

            catch (DirectoryNotFoundException)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("The current directory does not exist", "Directory Not Found",
                    MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Exclamation);
                continue;
            }

            string[] files = null;

            try
            {
                files = System.IO.Directory.GetFiles(currentDir);
            }

            catch (UnauthorizedAccessException)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("You do not have permission to access this folder", "Directory Permission Error",
                    MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Exclamation);
                continue;
            }

            catch (DirectoryNotFoundException)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("The current directory does not exist", "Directory Not Found",
                    MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Exclamation);
                continue;
            }



            foreach (string file in files)
            {
                try
                {
                    FileInfo fi = new FileInfo(file);
                    fileList.Add( new Record {
                        fileName = fi.Name,
                        fileSize = fi.Length
                    });
                }

                catch (FileNotFoundException)
                {
                    MessageBox.Show("The current file does not exist" + file, "File Not Found",
                    MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Exclamation);
                    continue;
                }
            }

            foreach (string str in subDirs)
                dirs.Push(str);
        }




    }

Form.cs

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace FileIterator
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void splitContainer1_Panel2_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e)
    {

    }
    string directory = " ";

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        folderBrowserDialog1.ShowDialog();
        directory = folderBrowserDialog1.SelectedPath;
        DirectoryName.Text = folderBrowserDialog1.SelectedPath;
        Iterator.Iterate(directory);

    }



}

}

share|improve this question
2  
try stepping through the code in your debugger... –  jsobo Jan 30 '12 at 16:52
    
possible duplicate of Iterate a File System and write results to CSV file –  John Saunders Jan 30 '12 at 19:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you are pushing the dir_tree onto your stack even after you determine that it does not exist. I think that is your main problem here:

    if (!Directory.Exists(dir_tree))
            {
                MessageBox.Show("The directory you selected does not exist.", "Directory Selection Error",
                MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Exclamation);
// maybe you should return or something here....
            }
            dirs.Push(dir_tree);
share|improve this answer

I think the main problem here is that you are attempting to load everything into a stack to begin with. Your program probably isn't freezing, it's just churning away trying to recursively iterate through the thousands of files and folders on your machine. That's going to take a long time.

Why not write to the CSV file as you go, so that you can at least see progress? You also might want to use a BackgroundWorker so that you can keep the UI responsive and maybe show some progress as the algorithm works it's way through the filesystem.

share|improve this answer
    
I really like the idea of writing the CSV as the program goes. How might I do that? –  broguyman Jan 30 '12 at 17:32
1  
Pretty straightforward really. Instead of creating your Record instance, just write the needed data out to a file. You probably would want to create a FileStream and wrap it in a StreamWriter at the beginning of your Iterate function, and then use that throughout the function. Have a look at StreamWriter.WriteLine: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…. Finally, make sure you Flush() your stream at the end. –  Chris Shain Jan 30 '12 at 18:30

Trying this out on the C:\ will take a LONG time, there are lots of files and it may take several minutes to process, all the time the UI will be frozen. As mentioned above a backgroundworker is the best plan if you do want to do this.

Other comments

The stack arrangement is cumbersome here do you need it? (Is this a homework/training exercise?) A simpler idea is just to recurse down the tree by re-calling Iterate at each level

e.g.

private class FileIterator {

    public IEnumerable<Record> Iterate(string path) {

        var currentFiles = new List<Record>(
            Directory.GetFiles(path).Select(file => {
                var fi = new FileInfo(file);
                return new Record{FileName = fi.Name, FileSize = fi.Length};
            }
        ));

        var childFiles = Directory.GetDirectories(path).SelectMany(dir => Iterate(dir));
        return currentFiles.Union(childFiles);

    }
}

Notes:

I omitted the security checks just to speed up coding on my part you may still to check them. The directory not found checks though I am dubious on? Is the file system contents likely to change in the time that your program is executing? Is this expected to be a regular occurrence?

Also, the Messagebox calls are not good here. They mess up any attempts at automated unit testing.

hth,
Alan.

share|improve this answer
    
This is just training exercise. Currently I'm a C programmer in UNIX, I'm trying to get a new job and I'm pretty much a noob at C# I'm just trying to use this project to get a feel for C# and .NET programming. –  broguyman Jan 30 '12 at 17:34

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