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I started studying classes and now I faced a problem. I'm trying to put all my variables into a class, but I get errors:

main.cpp|6|error: expected identifier before string constant| 
main.cpp|6|error: expected ',' or '...' before string constant|
main.cpp|7|error: expected identifier before string constant|
main.cpp|7|error: expected ',' or '...' before string constant|

Although when I make them global everything works fine

    class Kauliukas{

        ifstream inFile("inFile.in");
        ofstream outFile("outFile.out");
        int n, akutes[100],k=0;

        void ivedimas();
        void skaiciavimas();
        void isvedimas();
};

What's the problem?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Initialization goes in the constructor. That's different than, for instance, C#. You must define a constructor like

class Kauliukas {
public:
    Kauliukas() : inFile("inFile.in"), outFile("outFile.out"), k(0) {}
private:
    ifstream inFile;
    ofstream outFile;
    int n, akutes[100],k;

    void ivedimas();
    void skaiciavimas();
    void isvedimas();
};
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Yep, that's what I've wanted :) Thank you –  RnD Jan 30 '12 at 17:20
    
By the way, I read that making public variables in class is the worst, but how can I access private variables in my main and define them? –  RnD Jan 30 '12 at 17:27
2  
Note that in C++11, you can put initialization in the class definition, as long as the initialization expression is a constant expression. www2.research.att.com/~bs/C++0xFAQ.html#member-init –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 30 '12 at 17:28
1  
You must apply your judgement to design the public interface for your class. Data hiding require (in C++ more than, for instance, C#) more code, but guarantee better maintenance. If you remove the private: label you can access each variable from your main... –  CapelliC Jan 30 '12 at 17:41

In pre-C++11 versions of the language you can only declare variables inside the class body, you can't also initialize them (ifstream inFile is a declaration; ifstream inFile("infile.in") is a declaration and an initialization).

You have to do it like this:

class Kauliukas
{
  public:
    Kauliukas();

  private:
    ifstream inFile;
};

Kauliukas::Kauliukas()    // This is the constructor definition
    : inFile("infile.in") // This is called an initialization list
{
    // ...
}
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In standard C++ you can initialize members in the class definition. Check your copy of ISO 14882:2011. Whether compiler supports this standard is a different question. –  Dietmar Kühl Jan 30 '12 at 18:46
    
@DietmarKühl I don't have a copy of the standard to check. Is the section you mentioned also part of pre-C++11 versions of the language? –  Paul Manta Jan 30 '12 at 18:50
1  
Admittedly, the notation to initialize a member in a class either uses equal initialization (e.g. std::ifstream in = std::ifstream("file"); which also requires the class to be copy or move constructible) or brace initialization (e.g. std::ifstream in{"file"};), i.e. using parenthesis doesn't work. The corresponding section is 9.2 [class.mem] paragraph 5 which is new in C++2011: this wasn't part of C++2003. To get recent drafts of the standard, you can go to the committee's page. –  Dietmar Kühl Jan 30 '12 at 22:18

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