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I would like to create class which can't be copied, so I put copying constructor into the private section:

class NotCopyable
{
public:
    NotCopyable(const double& attr1, const double& attr2) : _attr1(attr1), _attr2(attr2) {}
    ~NotCopyable(void) {}

private:
    NotCopyable& operator=(const NotCopyable&);
    NotCopyable(const NotCopyable&);
    double _attr1;
    double _attr2;
};

Everything is OK except when I would like to assign the array:

NotCopyable arr[] =
{
    NotCopyable(1, 0),
    NotCopyable(2, 3)
};

The compiler says that she can't access copying constructor as it is in private section. When I put it in public section:

class NotCopyable
{
public:
    NotCopyable(const double& attr1, const double& attr2) : _attr1(attr1), _attr2(attr2) {}
    ~NotCopyable(void) {}
    NotCopyable(const NotCopyable&)
    {
        std::cout << "COPYING" << std:: endl;
    }
private:
    NotCopyable& operator=(const NotCopyable&);

    double _attr1;
    double _attr2;
};

Program compiles without errors, but copying constructor isn't called. So the question is: how do I forbid copying but still have possibility to assign arrays?

share|improve this question
4  
Impossible. "assigning" arrays is still "assignment", which you're trying to forbid –  valdo Jan 30 '12 at 17:30
2  
You can't assign to arrays. The code shown here is initializing an array, which, even if it uses the same symbol, is not assignment. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 30 '12 at 17:33
    
You may want to read this: physical-thought.blogspot.com/2008/08/… esp the second comment written by the author as to when you want to do this. –  James Black Jan 30 '12 at 17:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your code arr [] = { NotCopyable(1,2) }; does request the copy constructor, at least formally. Practically the copy is usually elided, but that falls under the "as-if" rule, and the copy constructor still has to be accessible, even though ultimately it isn't used. (In GCC you can say -fno-elide-constructors to actually invoke the copy constructor.)

You can't solve this in C++03, where brace-initialization always necessitates a formal copy. In C++11 you can use brace initialization to direct-initialize array members, though:

NotCopyable arr[] { {1, 0}, {2, 3} };

This works even in the absence of an accessible copy constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like you're right. –  Mike Seymour Jan 30 '12 at 18:15
    
This isn't the "as-if" rule, as that would require the output of "COPYING". This is the exception in 12.8/15 of the Standard, which essentially extends the "as-if" rule so the copy constructor need not be called when copying a temporary object (even if, as in this case, there are side effects in the copy constructor. –  David Thornley Jan 30 '12 at 18:55
    
@DavidThornley: I know, I was being a bit cavalier about that. Indeed, it is legal to elide the copy constructor even if it has side effects. What I meant was sort of a reverse "as-if" rule, in so far as both copy initialization and direct-initialization-through-copy-constructor imply semantics "as if" the copy constructor were to be called (and copy elision only kicks in later during optimization). –  Kerrek SB Jan 30 '12 at 22:32

It is incorrect, because you use array of objects that have to be created by copying:

#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class NotCopyable
{
public:
    NotCopyable(const double& attr1, const double& attr2) : _attr1(attr1), _attr2(attr2) {}
    ~NotCopyable(void) {}

private:
    NotCopyable& operator=(const NotCopyable&);
    NotCopyable(const NotCopyable&);
    double _attr1;
    double _attr2;
};

int main()
{
    vector<NotCopyable> v;
    NotCopyable a(1, 2);
    v.push_back(a); // THIS IS COPYING
    return 0;
}

Since you have disabled copying, you can store reference only. You should make it array of pointers:

NotCopyable a(1, 2);

// incorrect:
vector<NotCopyable> v;
v.push_back(a);

// correct:
vector<NotCopyable*> v2;
v2.push_back(&a);

Hope this helps ;)

share|improve this answer
NotCopyable arr[] =
{
    NotCopyable(1, 0),
    NotCopyable(2, 3)
};

When you write this, the compiler needs copy-constructor, as it is copy-initialization. That is why you get compilation error, as the copy-constructor is declared private, and so it is inaccessible from outside. However, if you define it in the public section, then it works, but copy-constructor is not getting called, which is because of the optimization done by the compiler. The specification allows the compiler to elide the invocation of the copy-constructor in such situation, however it still needs accessible copy-constructor only for semantic-check of the code. It isn't actually called once the semantic check is done!

share|improve this answer
    
But how to allow using constructor for initialization but forbid using in other cases? –  Seagull Jan 30 '12 at 17:35
    
Is it copy-initialization or direct-initialization using the copy-constructor? I.e. is T arr[] = { T(1), T(2) }; interpreted like T arr1(T(1)), arr2(T(2)); or like T arr1 = T(1), arr2 = T(2);? –  Kerrek SB Jan 30 '12 at 17:37
    
@KerrekSB: I think its copy-initilization. But that seems irrelevant here, because either way, the copy-constructor is needed for semantic check. –  Nawaz Jan 30 '12 at 17:39

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