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What is the difference between methods ## and hashCode?

They seem to be outputting the same values no matter which class or hashCode overloading I use. Google doesn't help, either, as it cannot find symbol ##.

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1  
1.0 hashCode v 1.0 ## v 1 hashCode v 1 ##scala-lang.org/api/current/scala/Any.html –  Debilski Jan 30 '12 at 17:50
3  
A little offtopic, but you can search for such symbols using SymbolHound. –  om-nom-nom Jan 30 '12 at 18:10
    
Ah ok. So, 1.hashCode == 1.##, and 1.2.hashCode == 1.2.##. The only thing that behaves differently is 1.0.hashCode != 1.0.## (so ## is better suited for comparing numbers). –  0__ Jan 30 '12 at 18:14
    
From the Scala docs on Any "Equivalent to x.hashCode except for boxed numeric types. For numerics, it returns a hash value which is consistent with value equality: if two value type instances compare as true, then ## will produce the same hash value for each of them.". –  Brian Jan 30 '12 at 18:15
    
@om-nom-nom, a little of topic, but thanks for the tip. That's awesome! –  Paul Draper Feb 19 at 10:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

"Subclasses" of AnyVal do not behave properly from a hashing perspective:

scala> 1.0.hashCode
res14: Int = 1072693248

Of course this is boxed to a call to:

scala> new java.lang.Double(1.0).hashCode
res16: Int = 1072693248

We might prefer it to be:

scala> new java.lang.Double(1.0).##
res17: Int = 1

scala> 1.0.##
res15: Int = 1

We should expect this given that the int 1 is also the double 1. Of course this issue does not arise in Java. Without it, we'd have this problem:

Set(1.0) contains 1 //compiles but is false

Luckily:

scala> Set(1.0) contains 1
res21: Boolean = true
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## was introduced because hashCode is not consistent with the == operator in Scala. If a == b then a.## == b.## regardless of the type of a and b (if custom hashCode implementations are correct). The same is not true for hashCode as can be seen in the examples given by other posters.

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Just want to add to the answers of other posters that although the ## method strives to keep the contract between equality and hash codes, it is apparently not good enough in some cases, like when you are comparing doubles and longs (scala 2.10.2):

> import java.lang._
import java.lang._

> val lng = Integer.MAX_VALUE.toLong + 1
lng: Long = 2147483648

> val dbl = Integer.MAX_VALUE.toDouble + 1
dbl: Double = 2.147483648E9

> lng == dbl
res65: Boolean = true

> lng.## == dbl.##
res66: Boolean = false

> (lng.##, lng.hashCode)
res67: (Int, Int) = (-2147483647,-2147483648)

> (dbl.##, dbl.hashCode)
res68: (Int, Int) = (-2147483648,1105199104)
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Really? Is this a bug? –  Paul Draper Feb 18 at 16:33
    
It clearly is as according to scaladoc for ## "... it returns a hash value which is consistent with value equality: if two value type instances compare as true, then ## will produce the same hash value for each of them..." –  starling Feb 19 at 9:29

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