Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to write a Player class in php that works with a function that I am not allowed to change. I have to write this class in a way that this function will return the maximum value. I can only use the integers between 1-10. I only copied the problematic part here:

function CalcPlayerPoints($Player) {

$Points = 0;

    foreach($Player as $key => $Value) {

    switch ($key) {
    case "profyears":
        if($Value===true) // this should be true
        $Points+=($Value*5); // this should take tha value I give in the class construct
        break;
    case "gentleman":
        if($Value===true) 
        $Points+=10;                
        break;
    }
   }
return $Points; // that should be maximized
}

Since I cant change the === comparison, I am not able to initialize the profyears attribute. If i initialize with 10, then it does not enter if statement...

public function __construct() {
   $this->gentleman = true;
   $this->profyears = 10;  
}
share|improve this question
1  
What is your question? –  Crontab Jan 30 '12 at 17:57
2  
if the $value === true, how do you expect the interpreter to multiply this by 5? –  JLevett Jan 30 '12 at 17:59
    
How is CalcPlayerPoints called? –  Rocket Hazmat Jan 30 '12 at 18:00
    
@JLevett That is valid php. After type casting true evaluates to 1, and false to 0; so a boolean * int is valid PHP. –  Mob Jan 30 '12 at 18:02
1  
@Mob It is valid PHP, but almost certainly not what the OP actually wants to do. The net result of that will be $Points += 5, and if that is what he is actually doing, why wouldn't he just write that? –  DaveRandom Jan 30 '12 at 18:07

3 Answers 3

This function does not work as the creator intended. The $Value variable is being evaluated as strictly boolean but then it has math operations preformed to it. There is no way to solve this problem without modifying the original function.

Also, there seems to be a missing closing bracket.

The function called as is:

function index()
{
   var_dump( $this->CalcPlayerPoints(array( 'profyears' => 10 )) );
}

function CalcPlayerPoints($Player) {

  $Points = 0;

     foreach($Player as $key => $Value) {

        switch ($key) {
            case "profyears":
                if($Value===true) // this should be true
                $Points+=($Value*5); // this should take tha value I give in the class construct
                break;
            case "gentleman":
                if($Value===true) 
                $Points+=10;                
                break;

        }
     }
return $Points; // that should be maximized
}

will display int 0 every time no matter what integer value you supply. If the original function can be modified to eliminate the strict comparison like:

function index()
{
   var_dump( $this->CalcPlayerPoints(array( 'profyears' => 10 )) );
}

function CalcPlayerPoints($Player) {

  $Points = 0;

     foreach($Player as $key => $Value) {

        switch ($key) {
            case "profyears":
                if($Value==true) // this should be true
                $Points+=($Value*5); // this should take tha value I give in the class construct
                break;
            case "gentleman":
                if($Value==true) 
                $Points+=10;                
                break;

        }
     }
return $Points; // that should be maximized
}

the function would return expected results: int 50

share|improve this answer
    
Think it is worth mentioning that the function expects a reference to an object (in old & reference style) and not an array. –  Luc Franken Jan 30 '12 at 18:24
    
The function in question makes no distinction. The OP seems to be using it that way, but an array is a perfectly valid parameter for this function, which should suffice for the sake of testing. –  wescrow Jan 30 '12 at 18:27
    
You would be right if this wasn't mentioned: I only copied the problematic part here That was mentioned in the start of this topic. Also the $Player starts with an uppercase P which indicates normally an object. So it might influence parts we don't see here, that's why I made note of it to prevent later issues on that. –  Luc Franken Jan 30 '12 at 18:31
    
This test is set up strictly to check the validity of the logic of this one function. It does just that. The context of the larger project is irrelevant. –  wescrow Jan 30 '12 at 18:36
    
Also, I reject the notion that we know that the $Player parameter is a referenced object simply by the use of a naming convention. This is an assumption that cannot be verified contextually. –  wescrow Jan 30 '12 at 18:39

It seems the CalcPlayerPoints function has a bug, as it makes to sense to do this:

if ($Value === true)
    $Points += $Value * 5;

I.e., "TRUE times 5" doesn't mean anything.

share|improve this answer

The only option this function allows is that profyears is a boolean, so true or false. No other option possible.

So the class handles profyears not as an amount of years but as whether there are profyears or not. So the only correct value in you __construct is true or false. This might be a strange naming convertion. It would make sense if it would names: hasProfYears for example.

some examples:
A gentleman with profyears gives: 15 points.
A non-gentleman with profyears gives 5 points.
A gentleman without profyears gives 10 points.
A non-gentleman without profyears gives 0 points.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.