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Here is the problem. I use minpack for non-linear optimization. The cost function has the following signature:

void cost_function(const int* n, const int* m,const double *p, double *x, int* iflag)

n - size of initial point m - size of function vector p - initial point x - function vector

I have for loop, where i iterate through the array of objects. Each object contain input information for optimization function.

for(int counter = 0; i < num_of_objects; ++counter)
{
    //get information from object
    //call optimization function
    lmdif1_(cost_function, m, n, initial_point, X, precision, info, iwa, wa, lwa);
}

but in cost function i need particular values connected with current object. If cost function would be a class member, then the pointer will have wrong type, and it will be impossible to pass this pointer to lmdif1_.

So now i have a temporary solution, using global object.

for(int counter = 0; i < num_of_objects; ++counter)
{
    //get information from object
    //call optimization function
    global_obj = object;
    lmdif1_(cost_function, m, n, initial_point, X, precision, info, iwa, wa, lwa);
}

Then cost_function uses this global object to recieve needed information. But it's not good. What is the right solution for this problem? Thanks.

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2  
Unfortunately it seems like they broke the first rule of callback design: Provide a caller-supplied pointer-sized parameter through unchanged to the callback. –  Ben Voigt Jan 30 '12 at 18:33
    
Maybe there are some ways, to solve this problem through static class members? I dont really have an idea how exactly... –  Alex Hoppus Jan 30 '12 at 19:07
    
A static class member is not much different than a global variable whose name starts with ClassName::. Same advantages and drawbacks. Only difference is it can be private, which is basically a global variable only accessible to certain functions (but so were static globals) –  Ben Voigt Jan 30 '12 at 21:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If those m, n, fvec arrays can be class members, you could maybe use the offsetof macro to recover the address of the class. (For how to do that, read this explanation of the non-standard container_of macro)

If they're dynamically allocated, it's harder, but you could allocate extra space in the buffer, and put a pointer to your class in front of the actual array data.

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You will have to use a global object.

There is the possibility of using thunks but these are complicated.

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for what purpose? –  Alex Hoppus Jan 30 '12 at 18:30
2  
A pointer-to-const-member-function is still not compatible with a function pointer. –  Ben Voigt Jan 30 '12 at 18:32
1  
The problem here is that a member function pointer is not a plain function pointer. It would require an instance (i.e., *this) to call that member function, which doesn't work with the minpack API. I am thinking if std::function would work with minpack. –  Ling Jan 30 '12 at 18:34
1  
@Ling: No, std:function isn't compatible with a plain function pointer. And neither is a lambda that captures any variables. –  Ben Voigt Jan 30 '12 at 18:37
    
Changed answer as thought he was referring to a member function. –  QuentinUK Jan 30 '12 at 18:38

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