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I am having an issue with memory management in ios. The problem is when I push a viewController which has a webView on to the navigation stack and when I click back before the webview is loaded I am getting exec_bad_access.

In 'Class A' I am creating a NewViewController, then I am pushing it on to the navigation stack, and then releasing it. So here I am giving away my ownership as I am releasing it.

Class A:

-(void)onButtonClick{
    NewViewController* viewController = [[NewViewController alloc] init];
    [self.navigationController pushViewController: viewController........];
    [viewController release];
}

Class B has a webView and a timer in it and implements UIWebViewDelegate. So, in here when the webView shouldStartLoad I am starting the timer. And then when it is done loading I am invalidating it.

Class B:

@interface NewViewController : UIViewController <UIWebViewDelegate>
    NSTimer* timer
    ......
@property(nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet UIWebView* webView;
@end

@implementation
-(void)viewDidLoad{
   [super viewDidLoad];
   [webView loadRequest:someRequest];
}
.....
.....
-(void)dealloc{
  [self makeTimerNil];
  [self.webView stoploading];
  self.webView.delegate = nil;
  [self.webView release];
  self.webView = nil;
  .....
  [super dealloc];
}

-(void)resetTimer{
    [self makeTimerNil];
    //timer will retain target - self
    timer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:kNetworkTimeOut target:self selector:@selector(networkTimedOut) userInfo:nil repeats:NO];
}

-(void)makeTimerNil{
    if([timer isValid]){
        [timer invalidate];
        timer = nil;
    }
}

-(BOOL)webView:(UIWebView *)webView shouldStartLoadWithRequest:(NSURLRequest *)request navigationType:(UIWebViewNavigationType)navigationType{
    [self resetTimer];
    ......
    return YES;
}

-(void)webViewDidFinishLoad:(UIWebView *)webView{
    //NO Exception. Can access self
    [self anotherMethod];
    //timer releases retained target -self
    [self makeTimerNil];
    //Exception self has been deallocated
    [self anotherMethod];
}
@end

But the issue is when the webView is loading if I click back button on the navigation bar, the newViewController is getting deallocated which is fine. But this is happening in the middle of execution of webViewDidFinishLoad. Why is dealloc being called in the middle of execution of webViewDidFinishLoad? Don't they run on the same thread (Main - UI Thread) ?

Any ideas on how to fix the issue?

share|improve this question
    
My suspicion (although I can't make sure not having an older SDK than 5.0 on this machine) is that the only thing that holds a reference to your viewcontroller is the Timer. When you do [timer invalidate], the timer is released and it in its turn releases your viewcontroller causing dealloc. –  Joachim Isaksson Jan 30 '12 at 18:37
    
@JoachimIsaksson: Yes, that right. Timer is holding on to the viewController and once it is invalidated it is releasing the viewController. –  Sai Jan 30 '12 at 18:42
1  
The invalidate documentation says; "The NSRunLoop object removes and releases the timer, either just before the invalidate method returns or at some later point." so that makes sense. –  Joachim Isaksson Jan 30 '12 at 18:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your problem is absolutely the timer. According to the NSTimer documentation, an active timer holds a retain on its target object. As a result, your controller cannot get dealloc'd while the timer is active. That in itself is a bug in your architecture, since from your -dealloc method it's obvious you're expecting the view controller to be dealloc'd while the timer is active. But in the case of the webview, it's causing another problem. Specifically, in the middle of your -webViewDidFinishLoad: method you're canceling your timer. This causes it to release its target, and since it was the only owner of your view controller, the view controller immediately deallocs.

share|improve this answer
    
Voted up, as I think this is correct. Deleting my previous answer since its not really relevant to the OP's issue. (After you reply to my comment b/c I'm curious!) –  MechEthan Jan 30 '12 at 19:41
    
@Kevin Ballard: Thanks for the reply. That is absolutely correct. I am trying to figure out what I can do to fix this issue. Any suggestions? –  Sai Jan 30 '12 at 20:01
    
@Sai: The best way is to stop relying on dealloc to trigger logic. You could add a -teardown method to your VC that is called when the VC is no longer needed. Or you could kill the timer in -viewDidDisappear: as others have suggested. However if you need the -dealloc logic, you could use a helper object whose sole job is to forward the timer invocation to your main class, and then the timer can point to the helper instead. That avoids the retain on your VC, and in your -dealloc you can cancel the timer and throw away the helper object. –  Kevin Ballard Jan 30 '12 at 20:09
    
@Kevin Ballard - Thanks. I added seperate class to handle the timer. Workes perfectly for now. –  Sai Jan 30 '12 at 23:33

dealloc will be called when the retain count drops to 0 and will happen immediately, not later on. It is happening on the thread that the count drops to 0 in, in your case the thread that webViewDidFinishLoad: is called in.

One this you could do here is to add a [self retain] at the top of your webViewDidFinishLoad: method and a [self release] at the bottom of it. However I'm not 100% sure if that method is guaranteed to run on the main thread and if a view controller gets dealloc'ed on a thread other than the main thread then there can be lots of problems.

To fix this really, I would override viewDidDisappear: and do all the tearing down of the web view there (i.e. setting the delegate to nil and stopping the timer, etc). That way it'll happen on the main thread and at the point you tap the back button.

share|improve this answer
    
Instead of overriding viewDidDisappear, I have that code in viewWillUnload and its still the same. –  Sai Jan 30 '12 at 18:56
    
@Sai - viewWillUnload is iOS 5 only and is not called when the view goes off screen. It's just called when a low memory situation occurs and the view is unloaded. You can't rely on it being called. –  mattjgalloway Jan 30 '12 at 18:58
    
Thanks for the info. I will try that and update the post. –  Sai Jan 30 '12 at 19:11
    
All webview delegate methods always run on the main thread. –  Kevin Ballard Jan 30 '12 at 19:30
    
I am hesitating to do that because I don't want to stop the webview or make the webview's delegate nil on view disappear. Because all the code I have in NewViewController is actullay in a AbstractViewController. I have both navigation controller and tabbar controller in the app. If I use viewWillDisappear it will affect the viewcontrollers in tabbar controller. Do you have any other suggestions? –  Sai Jan 30 '12 at 19:32

You are correctly nil'ing out the web view's delegate in -dealloc.

I think (but this might be wrong) that, as UI delegate methods, the web view delegate methods will always come in on the main thread, so that shouldn't be an issue. Nowhere else would threading come into play here.

Something that strikes me as a possible problem, though, is unrelated to your web view code per se.

Consider the interaction between

@property(nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet UIWebView* webView;

and

[self.webView release];
self.webView = nil;

Since you have declared webView as retained, won't self.webView = nil send a release to webView (and retain to nil, which of course doesn't do anything)? Isn't this then an over-release of webView?

(As a general rule, you shouldn't use accessors in init/dealloc, in part due to side-effects.)

EDIT:

To examine this further, I wrote a quick test using the view-based app template. Relevant portions below:

// In MyClass.m
+ (id)alloc
{
    NSLog(@"alloc");
    return [super alloc];
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    NSLog(@"dealloc");
    [super dealloc];
}

- (oneway void)release
{
    NSLog(@"release");
    [super release];
}

- (id)retain
{
    NSLog(@"retain");
    return [super retain];
}


// In UIViewController subclass
// .h:
#import "MyClass.h"
@property (retain, nonatomic) MyClass *myObj;
// .m:
@synthesize myObj = _myObj;
- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    [self setMyObj:[[[MyClass alloc] init] autorelease]];
    [self setMyObj:nil];
}

This produced the following output, indicating that setting nil does, as I expected, release the old object:

2012-01-30 11:04:37.277 ReleaseTest[56305:f803] alloc
2012-01-30 11:04:37.278 ReleaseTest[56305:f803] retain
2012-01-30 11:04:37.279 ReleaseTest[56305:f803] release
2012-01-30 11:04:37.282 ReleaseTest[56305:f803] release
2012-01-30 11:04:37.283 ReleaseTest[56305:f803] dealloc

An, unsurprisingly, adding an extraneous release crashed the app with an EXC_BAD_ACCESS:

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    [self setMyObj:[[[MyClass alloc] init] autorelease]];
    [[self myObj] release];
    [self setMyObj:nil];
}

2012-01-30 11:06:22.815 ReleaseTest[56330:f803] alloc
2012-01-30 11:06:22.817 ReleaseTest[56330:f803] retain
2012-01-30 11:06:22.818 ReleaseTest[56330:f803] release
2012-01-30 11:06:22.818 ReleaseTest[56330:f803] release
2012-01-30 11:06:22.819 ReleaseTest[56330:f803] dealloc

objc_release --> EXC_BAD_ACCESS in UIApplicationMain()

Of course, the code behaves identically if dot syntax is used (though dot syntax has the unfortunate effect of concealing the fact that it uses accessors, which is one reason I don't use it). I also tested by using an IBOutlet instead of instantiating in code. A lot more retain/releases, again unsurprisingly, but still a crash if I include an extra release:

2012-01-30 11:09:59.631 ReleaseTest[56389:f803] alloc
2012-01-30 11:09:59.633 ReleaseTest[56389:f803] retain
2012-01-30 11:09:59.634 ReleaseTest[56389:f803] retain
2012-01-30 11:09:59.635 ReleaseTest[56389:f803] retain
2012-01-30 11:09:59.636 ReleaseTest[56389:f803] retain
2012-01-30 11:09:59.636 ReleaseTest[56389:f803] retain
2012-01-30 11:09:59.637 ReleaseTest[56389:f803] release
2012-01-30 11:09:59.638 ReleaseTest[56389:f803] release
2012-01-30 11:09:59.638 ReleaseTest[56389:f803] release
2012-01-30 11:09:59.639 ReleaseTest[56389:f803] release
2012-01-30 11:09:59.640 ReleaseTest[56389:f803] release
2012-01-30 11:09:59.641 ReleaseTest[56389:f803] release
2012-01-30 11:09:59.641 ReleaseTest[56389:f803] dealloc

objc_msgSend --> EXC_BAD_ACCESS in UIApplicationMain()

So, in conclusion, I believe you do have a memory management error in your code, and this is responsible for some, if not all, of your crashes (which, I note, are of the same kind that I experimentally reproduced).

share|improve this answer
    
self.webView = nil doesn't send a release to webView. –  Sai Jan 30 '12 at 18:51
    
I disagree. Please see my code and comments above. –  Conrad Shultz Jan 30 '12 at 19:15
    
@ConradShultz: This doesn't explain the OP's question, but it's absolutely correct, he does have a memory issue. Calling self.webView = nil in his code will release the webview. One key recommendation here is saying [self.webview release] is ALWAYS wrong regardless of your memory semantics. You never call an accessor (in this case, self.webview) and then call -release on the results. It's just plain wrong. –  Kevin Ballard Jan 30 '12 at 19:32
    
@KevinBallard Yup, that's a point I have made (apparently in vain) here and elsewhere. :-( –  Conrad Shultz Jan 30 '12 at 19:35
    
I will change that to [webView release] instead of [self.webView release]; –  Sai Jan 30 '12 at 20:04

EDIT: This post is wrong and irrelevant to the OP. Struck-out the misleading text. Leaving rest here because I learned something in comments from Kevin below, and it may help someone else!


IF you don't need the webViewDidFinishLoad handling to occur on dealloc, set self.webView.delegate = nil; before calling stopLoading.

Also, you could manually call the webViewDidFinishLoad handling in the dealloc if any of it is needed and doesn't depend on the state of the webView.

I really wouldn't recommend putting a stopLoading in your dealloc. Just set the delegate to nil.

You should not design your dealloc to launch a lot of logic -- If your object is receiving a dealloc before its finished handling the logic you expect it to, then you are allowing it to be released it too quickly.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree that launching logic in dealloc is something you should avoid, but other than that, your advice is wrong. Calling -stopLoading on the webview before nilling out the delegate will not cause -webViewDidFinishLoading: to call. The reason being, -stopLoading is asynchronous, but nilling out the delegate is synchronous. By the time the -stopLoading actually decides to stop loading, the delegate is nilled out and cannot receive any messages. –  Kevin Ballard Jan 30 '12 at 19:30
    
Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't it still possible for webViewDidFinishLoading: to be called before the delegate is set to nil since they are two separate lines? Or not possible if everything is on the same RunLoop? –  MechEthan Jan 30 '12 at 19:35
    
The delegate method is always called on the main thread. Therefore it cannot "interrupt" the -dealloc and get called in between the -stopLoading and the webView.delegate = nil. It may only be called after control returns to the runloop (at which point the delegate is nil). The only way it could still be called is if webkit queries the webview's delegate, saves it, and then invokes the method on that saved object on the main thread, but it's highly unlikely that it behaves this way. –  Kevin Ballard Jan 30 '12 at 19:43
    
That makes sense. Thanks much @KevinBallard ! (Decided to keep post b/c this was useful information to me.) –  MechEthan Jan 30 '12 at 19:49

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