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I know this is probably the exact opposite of the questions asked on Stackoverflow, but something really weird happened to me today. I was trying to show someone how to work with Instruments and NSZombies, so I tried to create a crash.

I declared a NSString, released it and then tried to access it but the app didn't crash

NSString* test = [[NSString alloc] init];
[test release];
NSlog(@"%@", test);

I even tried to release it twice, but it still didn't make the app crash, it just printed null.

Can anyone please explain me what I did wrong or where is the flaw in my logic?

Thank you


EDIT : I tried something like this too and still no crash

NSString* test = [[NSString alloc] init];
test = @"something";
NSlog(@"%@", test);
[test release];
NSlog(@"%@", test);

I even added two consecutive releases, and a test = nil; after a release, just to make sure.

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That NSString was probably retained by someone else (check the retainCount). –  KennyTM Jan 30 '12 at 18:33
    
I'm sorry, I tried to add a new line, and I pressed enter by mistake, posting the question too soon. Can you read my question again, if you are kind enough? Thank you and sorry for my mistake –  BBog Jan 30 '12 at 18:36
    
turn off ARC and I bet that'll cause your crash. –  Michael Dautermann Jan 30 '12 at 18:42
    
Not an ARC issue, as he's using an explicit release call, forbidden under ARC. –  Macmade Jan 30 '12 at 18:45
1  
Calling [[NSString alloc] init] is highly likely to give you back a singleton object, which means you can't overrelease it. You should try making sure you have a once-off object, like [[NSMutableString alloc] init] instead. It's also worth wrapping an autorelease pool around the creation/destruction of the object in case there's any autoreleasing going on behind the scenes. –  Kevin Ballard Jan 30 '12 at 18:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

NSString may sometimes behave strangely.

In your example, you allocated a NSString without data.
That's the reason why it doesn't crash.

Allocating a NSString without data has no sense, as NSString objects are immutable.
In such a case, NSString will return a kind of singleton instance, meaning you can't release it (well, you can, but it will have no effect).
Every time you allocate a NSString object this way, the same instance will be returned.

Try this instead:

NSString * test = [ [ NSString alloc ] initWithCString: "hello, world" encoding: NSUTF8StringEncoding ];

[ test release ];

NSLog( @"%@", test );

Then it will crash, as expected...

To prove what I have explained earlier, try this:

NSString * test1 = [ [ NSString alloc ] init ];
NSString * test2 = [ [ NSString alloc ] init ];

NSLog( @"OK: %p %p", test1, test2 );

You can see the same address is printed, meaning only one object is allocated (the "singleton" one, for NSString objects without data).

EDIT

I've seen on your comment that you tried to "give the string a value".
This is not possible using NSString, as they are immutable.

I guess you tried this:

NSString * s = [ [ NSString alloc ] init ];

s = @"hello, world";

In such a case, you are not giving a value!

You are re-assigning a pointer!

It means your s variable (which is a pointer) will then point to another string object.
And it also mean you won't be able to access your previously allocated string, as you just lost the pointer to it.

If you want string objects that can be changed, take a look at the NSMutableString class.
But keep in mind that changing a pointer value is not the same as changing an object's value!

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Thanks, I will try this tomorrow at work and accept the answer it crashes :)) The weird thing is also tried this using data. I allocated the string, gave it a value, print it. Then release it and print it again. It printed null but the app didn't crash –  BBog Jan 30 '12 at 18:55
1  
What are you calling "give a value"? As I said, NSString objects are immutable. So I think you just assigned the pointer to another valid instance... In such a case, you didn't changed the object's value, you assigned to pointer to the original object to another object. –  Macmade Jan 30 '12 at 18:58
    
I mean I used something like test = @"abcd"; –  BBog Jan 30 '12 at 19:01
    
Ok, so see the edit... –  Macmade Jan 30 '12 at 19:03
    
Wow, now I feel really stupid.. In my defense, I only have 4 months of experience with objective-c. Anyway, I learned something new today, thanks! I really appreciate the fact that you explained everything so thoroughly –  BBog Jan 30 '12 at 19:10

There are two things going on in your example.

First, nothing else happened between your release and your NSLog that would modify the memory where your string was stored, so it happens to still be intact. You can't rely on that.

Second, the system has a special case for [[NSString alloc] init]. It returns a predefined object of type __NSCFConstantString that is never deallocated. If you print its reference count, you'll see that it is 2147483647 (0x7fffffff). That is a magic number indicating that any attempt to retain or release the object is ignored.

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If you take a look at the retainCount on an NSString allocated with either @"some_string" or [[NSString alloc] init] then you'll see that it's -1. This is because the compiler has known what the object is at compile time and has managed to store it as a literal. So when you release it, it's not actually going to do anything. It's not an object that has been allocated at runtime - it's just always there in your application binary.

You could make your crash occur by doing something like this on Mac:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    NSString *test = [[NSString alloc] initWithCString:argv[0] encoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];
    NSLog(@"test = %p", test);
    [test release];
    NSLog(@"test = %p", test);
    [test release];
    NSLog(@"test = %p", test);
    return 0;
}

The string is now no longer known at compile time, so it will actually be an object allocated and have a positive retain count, etc.

Note that NSNumber (on Mac OS X Lion) also exhibits this behaviour if the number is known at compile time. This is even more interesting as it's an example of tagged pointers in action. Take a look at this blog article for a discussion on that. And here is some code to show it:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    NSNumber *test = [[NSNumber alloc] initWithInt:1];
    NSLog(@"test = %p", test);
    [test release];
    NSLog(@"test = %p", test);
    [test release];
    NSLog(@"test = %p", test);
    return 0;
}

Note that also doesn't crash, it just prints out test = 0x183 3 times.

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I also tried to use test = nil; after the release, just to make sure but it didn't crash that way either. I'll try your suggestion tomorrow, at work. Thank you for your help and explanation! I really appreciate it –  BBog Jan 30 '12 at 18:57
    
I guess this is the correct Answer. –  KIDdAe Nov 18 at 15:35

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