Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I started to make a simple domino game. (the one where you place the tiles with same numbers next to each other). I started modelling it and i seem to have landed in a tough spot now. Im modelling the actual domino (called "bone"):

namespace DominoCore
{
    public enum BoneOrientation { Horizontal, Vertical }

    public interface IBone
    {
        int FirstValue { get; }
        int SecondValue { get; }
        BoneOrientation Orientation { get; set; }
    }
}

After this type I need to lay them out on the playing field. I made a playing field with square tiles in it:

namespace DominoCore
{
    public interface IField
    {
        IPlayer FirstPlayer { get; }
        IPlayer SecondPlayer { get; }
        IBoneYard BoneYard { get; }
        List<ITile> Tiles { get; }

        void PlaceBone(IPlayer player, IBone bone, int startX);
    }
}

The playing field has two players and a Boneyard (the dominoes not given to players) and then a list of tiles.

namespace DominoCore
{
    public enum BoneExpandDirection { Up, Down, Right, Left }

    public interface ITile
    {
        int X { get; }
        int Y { get; }
        IBone Bone { get; set; }
        BoneExpandDirection ExpandDirection { get; set; }
    }
}

Now comes my problems:,

  1. If I get a domino (Bone) with the value of (1,3) and want to place it on the field, how do I represent the location of where it has been placed (e.g. tile with coordinate 5,5)
  2. Does the domino tile then expand to the right from 5,5?
  3. What if I turn it 90 degrees, then the orientation is upward, turn it 180 degrees then its to the left - and the value is now (3,1).
  4. How do I make this distinction between layout, domino and tile?

I guess at some point I need to figure out, when a player places a tile - to calculate if its legal (search the field for tiles/bones). The various placements of the same domino /bone is shown in image below.

The next problem is laying out the dominos/bones, I am thinking about making a grid, but that doesnt fit with placing a tile "across" (perpendicular) other dominos/bones. When placing a tile I'm back at the first problem: how to validate it its legal? how to find the domino it borders with?

Hope this is making sense - I find it hard to describe the layout and the validation problem im facing.

Various domino scenarios

EDIT When starting the game the Bones in play are:

[6,6] [6,5] [6,4] [6,3] [6,2] [6,1] [6,0]
[5,5] [5,4] [5,3] [5,2] [5,1] [5,0]
[4,4] [4,3] [4,2] [4,1] [4,0] 
[3,3] [3,2] [3,1] [3,0]
[2,2] [2,1] [2,0]
[1,1] [1,0]
[0,0]

Each tile can be reversed this means that tile [6,3] can also be flipped 180 degrees and used as [3,6]

share|improve this question
    
Is scenario A a legal move? I'm trying to figure out the rules you are trying to code. –  Chris Shain Jan 30 '12 at 18:57
    
Im sorry for my laziness, im not good with paint so i managed only to draw a single Bone. There are rules that say that you can only place a Bone/domino next to a Domino with same end value. This means that my example in scenario a is wrong and and one of the Dominos sould be reversed, so that either the 3 or the 1 are matching. You would want to build a sequence like this: (1,3)(3,2)(2,4)(4,5)(5,6) etc. where adjacent numberes are of equal value. –  Brian Hvarregaard Jan 30 '12 at 20:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems like a grid is a reasonable approach, but it's a logical grid, and doesn't directly correlate to the physical layout of the tiles. Assuming the grid is a two-dimensional structure, roughly

(0,0),(0,1),(0,2),(0,3)
(1,0),(1,1),(1,2),(1,3)
(2,0),(2,1),(2,2),(2,3)
(3,0),(3,1),(3,2),(3,3)

Then you need to keep track of the cell that a tile is in and it's orientation (a byte or enum will do here, since there are only 4 possible values). checking for legality is easy enough- assuming that orientation is an enum:

public enum BoneOrientation {
    Horizontal = 0
    Vertical = 1
    Reversed = 2
}

and you have some class BonePlacement:

public class BonePlacement {
    public int X { get; set; }
    public int Y { get; set; }
    public BoneOrientation Orientation { get; set; }
    public IBone Bone { get; set; } 
}

Finally,

// Assuming you have some `List<BonePlacement>` called placements
public boolean ValidNextMove(BonePlacement placement) {
    if (placements.Count == 0) return true; // presumably the first move is always allowed
    if ((placement.Orientation && BoneOrientation.Horizontal) == BoneOrientation.Horizontal) {
        // The move being tested is a horizontal placement
        if ((placement.Orientation && BoneOrientation.Reversed) == BoneOrientation.Reversed) {
            // The tile is reversed
            // Check for a neighboring tile in an acceptable configuration
        } else {
            // The tile is not reversed
            // Check for a neighboring tile in an acceptable configuration
        }
    } else {
        // The move being tested is a vertical placement
        if ((placement.Orientation && BoneOrientation.Reversed) == BoneOrientation.Reversed) {
            // The tile is reversed
            // Check for a neighboring tile in an acceptable configuration
        } else {
            // The tile is not reversed
            // Check for a neighboring tile in an acceptable configuration
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So, a bone with initial value (3,4) placed on 2,2 with horizontal orientation would occupy (3,4) and (4,4). In vertical alignment its (3,4) and (3,5). How then about the reverse, each of these scenarios could be reversed to that it would match a Bone of value (4,3) placed on 2,3 horizontal. All Bones can have 4 mutations (see my image, upper left) –  Brian Hvarregaard Jan 30 '12 at 20:26
    
No no, you mistake me, a bone with initial value (3,4) placed on 2,2 with a horizontal, non-reversed orientation would only occupy 2,2- there is no need for the bones to occupy multiple cells. A bone with value (5,4) placed on (2,1) with a horizontal orientation would be an acceptable next move, for instance. Like I said, the grid is logical, not visual. –  Chris Shain Jan 30 '12 at 20:50

What about linking the bones together?

public interface IBone
{
    int FirstValue { get; }
    int SecondValue { get; }
    BoneOrientation Orientation { get; set; }
    IBone left { get; set; }
    IBone right { get; set; }
    IBone upper { get; set; }
    IBone lower { get; set; }
}

In order to determine the coordinates of the bones, you would then need a recursive algorithm in order to traverse this tree-like structure.

share|improve this answer
    
Agree, it's a very natural binary tree-like structure. –  Haspemulator Dec 9 '13 at 14:11

It seems like your grid should have a minimum resolution of .5*(length of short side), assuming the length of the Bone's long side is a multiple of the length of the short side. This will allow for all sorts of different shape configurations such as scenario C.

To say it a different way, use a square grid and then overlay 2x4 size Bones on that grid.

Next you should come up with a convention for marking the location of the Bones, such as the upper left hand corner. For instance, a Bone with coordinates (3,3) and vertical orientation could refer to a 2x4 vertical Bone whose upper-left most tile lies at (3,3) on the board grid. The Bone would extend out to (4,3) on the right, and (3,6) and (4,6) on the bottom.

You would then need to run some validation after block placement to ensure that the Bone doesn't exceed the right or bottom edges of the game board.

I don't know the rules of the game, but it might help to keep an IsFlipped bool property which would display (1,3) differently (1 before 3 or vice-versa) without changing the internal representation of the Bone's values.

As far as scoring, you could maintain some information about which Bones are linked to others within your Bone implementation, and use that information to either keep a running tally of scores as blocks are placed, or have some other ruleset object that can consume a list of Bones and caluclate a score at any time.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.