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So this seems like it's a very simple problem to anyone at all conversant in assembly, but I was hoping someone could explain to me what the difference between the following two pieces of code are, given that one results in a segmentation fault and the other doesn't, but (to me) they seem like they should be logically equivalent.

Works fine:

char *src1; int esi_out, eax;
__asm__
  __volatile__(
     "lodsb\n\t;"
     : "=&S" (esi_out), "=&a" (eax)
     : "0" (src1)
);
printf("src1 %c @ %p, esi_out: %x, eax: %x\n", *src1, src1, esi_out, eax);

and prints:

src1 w @ 0x7fffce186959, esi_out: ce18695a, eax: ce186977

So my understanding it that this code should load the value of src1 (which is an address) into ESI, copy that value into EAX, increment the address in ESI by 1 byte, and then upon exiting, output those values into local C variables esi_out and eax. src1 and esi_out look correct, but eax seems like it's off. What's going on here?

The second bit of code is where we see a segfault that I can't quite come to grips with:

__asm__
  __volatile__(
        "movl %%ebx, %%esi\n\t;"
        //"lodsb\n\t;"                                                                                                                  
        : "=&S" (esi_out), "=&b" (ebx), "=&a" (eax)
        : "1" (src1)
);
printf("src1 %c @ %p, esi_out: %x, eax: %x, ebx: %x\n", 
                        *src1, src1, esi_out, eax, ebx);

With the lodsb command commented out, it produces:

src1 w @ 0x7ffff093b959, esi_out: f093b959, eax: f093b959, ebx: f093b959

And with the lodsb command not commented out, it segfaults. To my way of thinking, loading the ESI value directly, as in the first case above, and loading it into EBX and then movl'ing it into ESI should be equivalent, no?

What am I missing? Why does the value written into EAX look off? I wrote the equivalent program directly into assembly and stepped through it using gdb and it works fine.

Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

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1  
It was indeed an issue regarding the use of 64-bit pointers but only moving the lower 32 bits into the register. Thanks all. –  fromClouds Jan 30 '12 at 22:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From the looks of the output of the %p in your printf, you're compiling for 64 bits but your asm code is assuming 32 bits. Try

__asm__
  __volatile__(
        "movl %%rbx, %%rsi\n\t;"
        "lodsb\n\t;"    
        : "=&S" (esi_out), "=&b" (ebx), "=&a" (eax)
        : "1" (src1)
);
printf("src1 %c @ %p, esi_out: %x, eax: %x, ebx: %x\n", 
                        *src1, src1, esi_out, eax, ebx);

You should also declare esi_out and ebx as a pointer type (void* or char*) or uintptr_t.

What was happening is that lodsb uses RSI as its source address in 64 bits mode but you were putting only the low 32 bits of the pointer value into RSI so it doesn't contain a valid address, hence the segfault. As Slagh says, only the low 8 bits of the a register (al) are modified by lodsb. You should either mask off the other bits (eax & 0xff), clear rax (xor %rax,%rax) or declare eax as a char.

You should also find a resource about x86_64 assembly in general if this is a surprise to you.

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You have some errors:

You are on a 64 bit architecture, a int is not big enough to hold a pointer. The esi_out variable should be 64 bits wide, or better just use ptrdiff_t. And you should name it rsi_out ;-)

The lodsb instruction in 64 bit mode implictly referres to rsi and not esi. In the instruction before movl %%ebx, %%esi you set only the lower half of rsi, the upper half gets implictly cleared. Change it to movq %%rbx, %%rsi.

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ptrdiff_t is not the right type to use here, it is for the difference between two pointers and doesn't need to be wide enough to store a whole pointer –  Geoff Reedy Jan 30 '12 at 21:43

Your first question - lodsb is modifying AL but not the remainder of EAX. The last byte in your EAX value of ce186977 is 0x77 which is hex for lowercase 'w'.

I'm unfortunately not familiar with GCC assembly syntax - when you run your code and step over the movl, which register is the destination? To me it looks that EBX is writing ESI. What's in EBX before your code?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Slagh. The EBX is initialized with the value of src1. The format of an inline asm instruction in gcc is __asm__(.data : outputs : inputs (: clobbered)), with the outputs and inputs controlling what comes into and out of the asm portion. In this case, the outputs are esi_out read from ESI (=&S), ebx read from EBX (=&b), and eax read from EAX (=&a); and the input is src1 read into EBX where "1" denotes argument $1, which the compiler assigns to all inputs and outputs starting from $0. In this case: {$0 = esi_out, 1 = ebx, etc.} –  fromClouds Jan 30 '12 at 20:46

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