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please advice how to match the ERROR strings that comes only after "]" char by awk or sed

   [Mon Jan 30 21:14:01 IST 2012] ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found 

My target is to count all ERROR words that appears only after "]” character in the log file

remark - between “]” and ERROR must be one space or more

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

My target is to count all ERROR words that appears only after "]” character in the log file

remark - between “]” and ERROR must be one space or more

then you don't need those nuclear heads like awk, sed even perl. grep does it for you like this:

 grep -Pc ']\s+ERROR' yourLogFile

small test:

kent$  echo "[Mon Jan 30 21:14:01 IST 2012] ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found "|grep -Pc ']\s+ERROR'
1
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its not work on my linux - redhat 5.1 -echo "[Mon Jan 30 21:14:01 IST 2012] ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found "| grep -Ec ']\s+ERROR' 0 – user1121951 Jan 31 '12 at 9:29
    
@Eytan pls try with echo "..."|grep -Pc '...' – Kent Jan 31 '12 at 10:15

AWK:

awk -F"] " '/ERROR/{print $2}' inputfile

Test:

[jaypal:~] echo "[Mon Jan 30 21:14:01 IST 2012] ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found " | awk -F"] " '/ERROR/{print $2}'
ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found 

Perl:

perl -pe 's/.*(?<=] )(.*)/$1/' inputfile

Test:

echo "[Mon Jan 30 21:14:01 IST 2012] ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found " | perl -pe 's/.*(?<=] )(.*)/$1/'
ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found 

Count no. of occurrences:

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat file
[Mon Jan 30 21:14:01 IST 2012] ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found
[Mon Jan 30 21:14:01 IST 2012] ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found
[Mon Jan 30 21:14:01 IST 2012] ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found
[Mon Jan 30 21:14:01 IST 2012] ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found
[Mon Jan 30 21:14:01 IST 2012] ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found
[Mon Jan 30 21:14:01 IST 2012] ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found
[Mon Jan 30 21:14:01 IST 2012] ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found
[Mon Jan 30 21:14:01 IST 2012] ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found
[Mon Jan 30 21:14:01 IST 2012] ERROR file /etc/ghy.txt not found

[jaypal:~/Temp] awk -F"] " '/ERROR/{a[NR]=$2}END{print "count is " length(a)}' file
count is 9
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This might work for you:

grep -c '\] \+ERROR' file

Or

grep -c '\][[:space:]]\+ERROR' file

Or

sed '/\]\s\+ERROR/!d' file | wc -l
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Here is a shell only snippet, that should be faster than using any external programs (for small file reads) since it only uses shell builtins. It can be modified to handle errors case by case while running in a daemon mode (by tail-ing the log file to a fifo instead of reading it directly and modifying the case conditionals)

not the intended use of echo, but it does reduce spaces/tabs to 1 space

FILE="logfile"
ERRORS=0
while read LINE || [ "$LINE" ]; do
    case "`echo $LINE`" in
        *\]" "ERROR*)ERRORS=$(($ERRORS+1));;
    esac
done < "${FILE}"
echo $ERRORS
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It's doubtful that a shell while loop would be faster than grep, do you have timings? – tripleee Jan 31 '12 at 14:40
    
grep is faster to just find those specific lines once you get to files with 100+ lines; however, grep doesn't allow you to manipulate the data in a meaningful way, whereas using while-read-case permits you to do something actually useful like substring manipulation on the $LINE variable or to call a function based on the error (the couple of hundredths of a second difference are more than made up for in this case) – technosaurus Feb 1 '12 at 3:31
    
I agree that it's probably not significant, but you did write "should be faster" which is doubtful. – tripleee Feb 1 '12 at 6:14

You can do

sed -n '/] ERROR/p' infile
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Fails to account for multiple spaces before ERROR, and is more idiomatic with grep (and likely faster, too). – tripleee Jan 30 '12 at 21:49

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