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I just wounder if there will be a big performance difference whit these 2 queries

SELECT 
  `items_id`, `sport_id`, `sport`, `title`, `url`, 
  `Select3`, `Select6`, `id`, `data`,`image` as image,
  concat('index.php?option=sports&item=',`items_id`,'&p=C108-M108') as count_url
FROM 
  qy9zh_dataitems
WHERE Select6 LIKE '%sport%'
ORDER BY `Select9` DESC LIMIT 0, 4


SELECT 
  `items_id`, `sport_id`, `sport`, `title`, `url`, 
  `Select3`, `Select6`, `id`, `data`,`image` as image,
  concat('index.php?option=sports&item=',`items_id`,'&p=C108-M108') as count_url
FROM 
  qy9zh_dataitems 
WHERE Select6 in ('sport') 
ORDER BY `Select9` DESC LIMIT 0, 4

The queries are working just fine.. both of them.. just worried about the performance :)

Edit: A strange thing when I do some testing is this:

SELECT * FROM qy9zh_dataitems WHERE Select6 in ('kvinna') LIMIT 0, 40000

29,051 total, Query took 0.2581 sec

SELECT * FROM qy9zh_dataitems WHERE Select6 LIKE ('%kvinna%') LIMIT 0, 40000

29,113 total, Query took 0.2218 sec

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3  
Do you know that both queries have different results? –  danihp Jan 30 '12 at 21:34
    
The result is not an issue.. just curious about performance :) –  Mackelito Jan 30 '12 at 21:36
3  
The kill performance issue is the starting wildcard in first query like. –  danihp Jan 30 '12 at 21:39
    
The results you got in your edit are probably because you ran them immediately after each other; caching can impact results. Just do an EXPLAIN PLAN and look at the output - the LIKE query will show that a TABLE SCAN is needed, meaning that every single row has to be examined because of the starting wildcard. –  Ken White Jan 30 '12 at 23:12
    
The two queries do not mean the same thing, you should compare Select6 in ('kvinna') with Select6 = 'kvinna'. Both look for rows where Select6 is equal to 'kvinna'. However Select6 LIKE ('%kvinna%') looks for rows where Select6 contains 'kvinna'. It would also find 'abc kvinna xyz'. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Feb 1 '12 at 18:01
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If an index is defined on a column and you are looking for the beginning of this column as in

name LIKE 'Jo%' 

the index can be used to speed up the query. However, if you are looking for any part of a word as in

name LIKE '%man%' 

The index cannot be used.

The IN clause is generally very fast, however I do not know if it can take advantage of an index.

The speed of the query depends on the availability of an appropriate index, on the size of the table, on the distribution of the values (many rows with the same values, each row with different values) and of course on the query itself. I think that your question cannot be generally answered. Make tests and compare!

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These are not even close to being the same queries, and therefore the performance can't be compared.

The second query can use an index on Select6 to limit the rows to those that equal sport, while the first has to look at every single row to see if it contains sport anywhere in the contents of Select6. You're trying to compare apples and oranges.

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Sorry.. I´m not a backend/database guy.. just a simple frontend dev ;) Is there some way I can use a index in the first query? My problem is that the second one did let me use wildcards :/ –  Mackelito Jan 30 '12 at 21:43
    
No, you can't use an index when you use LIKE with a wildcard at the beginning. Think about the plain text meaning: Give me all the rows where Select6 starts with 0 or more characters, then contains the word 'sport', and then has anything (or nothing) after it. Since a match could be sport, or abracadabara sports are like magic, there's no way an index can help with the search. If you can limit it to a specific word at the beginning (LIKE 'sport%') instead, an index can help somewhat (although the one with no like can still be marginally faster, as the server can limit rows.) –  Ken White Jan 30 '12 at 21:50
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These are very different criteria.

WHERE Select6 LIKE '%sport%'

will look for the case where select6 contains the word sport.

WHERE Select6 in ('sport') 

will look for the case where select6 is the word sport.

An IN criteria allows you to specify a list of possible values, and should be very fast, if you've indexed the field. A like, especially a like that is looking for the word anywhere in a string can be difficult to index at all. Where select6 like 'sport%' would look for a case where select6 starts with the word sport and would be indexable.

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As everyone else posted, basic indexes cannot be used for searches with a leading wild card. If you think those queries are going to be the most common, you want to look at the Full Text Search functions in MySQL.

Full Text Searches provide an efficient way of finding records based on individual words in text. But even then there will be limitations (for example, searching for the word "port" would not necessarily return records like "sport").

MySQL Full Text Search

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