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I have a class, Symbol_Group, that represents an invertible expression of the nature AB(C+DE) + FG. Symbol_Group contains a List<List<iSymbol>>, where iSymbol is an interface applied to Symbol_Group, and Symbol.

The above equation would be represented as A,B,Sym_Grp + F,G; Sym_Grp = C + D,E, where each + represents a new List<iSymbol>

I need to be able to invert and expand this equation using an algorithm that can handle any amount of nesting, and any amount of symbols anded or ored together, to produce a set of Symbol_Group, with each containing a unique expansion. For the above question the answer set would be !A!F; !B!F; !C!D!F; !C!E!F; !A!G; !B!G; !C!D!G; !C!E!G;

I know that I will need to use recursion, but I have had very little experience with it. Any help figuring out this algorithm would be appreciated.

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I don't quite understand how the answer set you describe is to be interpreted and how it relates to the expression. The negation of AB(C+DE) + FG is (!A+!B+!C(!D+!E))(!F+!G); how is this to be "expanded" into the answers that you list? –  Aasmund Eldhuset Jan 30 '12 at 22:58
    
Your negation is just the negation of the individual elements thereof. I need to negate the entire expression, and then expand out using DeMorgans theorem: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Morgan's_laws. So I am looking for !(AB(C+DE) + FG), not what you wrote. –  3Pi Jan 30 '12 at 23:09
    
Apply DeMorgan's laws recursively to !(AB(C+DE) + FG), and you will successively get !(AB(C+DE))!(FG), (!A+!B+!(C+DE))(!F+!G), and finally (!A+!B+!C(!D+!E))(!F+!G). So again: how is this expression related to !A!F; !B!F; ...? –  Aasmund Eldhuset Jan 31 '12 at 10:08
    
You're almost there. Now just expand the brackets. –  3Pi Jan 31 '12 at 19:05
    
D'oh! Now I see what you want. Writing an answer... –  Aasmund Eldhuset Jan 31 '12 at 21:14

3 Answers 3

Unless you are somehow required to use a List<List<iSymbol>>, I recommend switching to a different class structure, with a base class (or interface) Expression and subclasses (or implementors) SymbolExpression, NotExpression, OrExpression, and AndExpression. A SymbolExpression contains a single symbol; a NotExpression contains one Expression, and OrExpression and AndExpression contain two expressions each. This is a much more standard structure for working with mathematical expressions, and it is probably simpler to perform the transformations on it.

With the above classes, you can model any expression as a binary tree. Negate the expression by replacing the root by a NotExpression whose child is the original root. Then, traverse the tree with a depth-first search, and whenever you hit a NotExpression whose child is an OrExpression or an AndExpression, you can replace that by an AndExpression or an OrExpression (respectively) whose children are NotExpressions with the original children below them. You might also want to eliminate double negations (look for NotExpressions whose child is a NotExpression, and remove both).

(Whether this answer is understandable probably depends on how comfortable you are with working with trees. Let me know if you need clarification.)

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I haven't done an awful lot of work with trees, which is how I ended up with the List<List<>> structure. However, I do see what you are trying to get across there, and if I wasn't so close to an answer with what I had, I would switch. I may still try and implement it if I have time. Thanks for your time! –  3Pi Jan 31 '12 at 21:32
    
@3Pi: No problem. I'd definitely recommend playing around with such tree structures; it's a lot of fun, and it's how compilers and interpreters represent the structure of not only mathematical expressions, but of the entire source code. –  Aasmund Eldhuset Jan 31 '12 at 22:13
up vote 0 down vote accepted

After much work, this is the method I used to get the minimum terms of inversion.

    public List<iSymbol> GetInvertedGroup()
    {
        TrimSymbolList();
        List<List<iSymbol>> symbols = this.CopyListMembers(Symbols);
        List<iSymbol> SymList;
        while (symbols.Count > 1)
        {
            symbols.Add(MultiplyLists(symbols[0], symbols[1]));
            symbols.RemoveRange(0, 2);
        }
        SymList = symbols[0];
        for(int i=0;i<symbols[0].Count;i++)
        {
            if (SymList[i] is Symbol)
            {
                Symbol sym = SymList[i] as Symbol;
                SymList.RemoveAt(i--);
                Symbol_Group symgrp = new Symbol_Group(null);
                symgrp.AddSymbol(sym);
                SymList.Add(symgrp);
            }
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < SymList.Count; i++)
        {
            if (SymList[i] is Symbol_Group)
            {
                Symbol_Group SymGrp = SymList[i] as Symbol_Group;
                if (SymGrp.Symbols.Count > 1)
                {
                    List<iSymbol> list = SymGrp.GetInvertedGroup();
                    SymList.RemoveAt(i--);
                    AddElementsOf(list, SymList);
                }
            }
        }
        return SymList;
    }

    public List<iSymbol> MultiplyLists(List<iSymbol> L1, List<iSymbol> L2)
    {
        List<iSymbol> Combined = new List<iSymbol>(L1.Count + L2.Count);
        foreach (iSymbol S1 in L1)
        {
            foreach (iSymbol S2 in L2)
            {
                Symbol_Group newGrp = new Symbol_Group(null);
                newGrp.AddSymbol(S1);
                newGrp.AddSymbol(S2);
                Combined.Add(newGrp);
            }
        }
        return Combined;
    }

This resulted in a List of Groups of Symbols, with each group representing 1 or term in the final result (e.g !A!F). Some further code was used to reduce this to a List>, as there was a reasonable amount of nesting in the answer. To reduce it, I used:

    public List<List<Symbol>> ReduceList(List<iSymbol> List)
    {
        List<List<Symbol>> Output = new List<List<Symbol>>(List.Count);
        foreach (iSymbol iSym in List)
        {
            if (iSym is Symbol_Group)
            {
                List<Symbol> L = new List<Symbol>();
                (iSym as Symbol_Group).GetAllSymbols(L);
                Output.Add(L);
            }
            else
            {
                throw (new Exception());
            }
        }
        return Output;
    }

    public void GetAllSymbols(List<Symbol> List)
    {
        foreach (List<iSymbol> SubList in Symbols)
        {
            foreach (iSymbol iSym in SubList)
            {
                if (iSym is Symbol)
                {
                    List.Add(iSym as Symbol);
                }
                else if (iSym is Symbol_Group)
                {
                    (iSym as Symbol_Group).GetAllSymbols(List);
                }
                else
                {
                    throw(new Exception());
                }
            }
        }
    }

Hope this helps someone else!

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I came to this simpler solution after a bit of rejigging. I hope it helps out somebody else with a similar problem! This is the class structure (plus a few other properties)

public class SymbolGroup : iSymbol
{

    public SymbolGroup(SymbolGroup Parent, SymRelation Relation)
    {
        Symbols = new List<iSymbol>();
        this.Parent = Parent;
        SymbolRelation = Relation;
        if (SymbolRelation == SymRelation.AND)
            Name = "AND Group";
        else
            Name = "OR Group";
    }

    public int Depth
    {
        get
        {
            foreach (iSymbol s in Symbols)
            {
                if (s is SymbolGroup)
                {
                    return (s as SymbolGroup).Depth + 1;
                }
            }
            return 1;
        }
    }
}

The method of inversion is also contained within this class. It replaces an unexpanded group in the results list with all of the expanded results of that result. It only strips away one level at a time.

    public List<SymbolGroup> InvertGroup()
    {
        List<SymbolGroup> Results = new List<SymbolGroup>();

        foreach (iSymbol s in Symbols)
        {
            if (s is SymbolGroup)
            {
                SymbolGroup sg = s as SymbolGroup;
                sg.Parent = null;
                Results.Add(s as SymbolGroup);
            }
            else if (s is Symbol)
            {
                SymbolGroup sg = new SymbolGroup(null, SymRelation.AND);
                sg.AddSymbol(s);
                Results.Add(sg);
            }
        }

        bool AllChecked = false;
        while (!AllChecked)
        {
            AllChecked = true;
            for(int i=0;i<Results.Count;i++) 
            {
                SymbolGroup result = Results[i];
                if (result.Depth > 1)
                {
                    AllChecked = false;
                    Results.RemoveAt(i--);
                }
                else
                    continue;

                if (result.SymbolRelation == SymRelation.OR)
                {
                    Results.AddRange(result.MultiplyOut());
                    continue;
                }

                for(int j=0;j<result.nSymbols;j++)
                {
                    iSymbol s = result.Symbols[j];
                    if (s is SymbolGroup)
                    {
                        result.Symbols.RemoveAt(j--);   //removes the symbolgroup that is being replaced, so that the rest of the group can be added to the expansion.
                        AllChecked = false;
                        SymbolGroup subResult = s as SymbolGroup;
                        if(subResult.SymbolRelation == SymRelation.OR)
                        {
                            List<SymbolGroup> newResults;
                            newResults = subResult.MultiplyOut();
                            foreach(SymbolGroup newSg in newResults)
                            {
                                newSg.Symbols.AddRange(result.Symbols);
                            }
                            Results.AddRange(newResults);
                        }
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        return Results;
    }
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