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I'm starting to learn Java..I am very excited.
First code is not return result as my want..

import java.util.Scanner;
public class Yusuf
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Scanner text = new Scanner(System.in);
        int a,b;
        System.out.print("Enter first number:");
        a = text.nextInt();
        System.out.print("Enter second number:");
        b = text.nextInt();
        System.out.print("a + b = " + a+b);
    }
}

This code's result is "a + b = 1525" (if a=15 and b=25 (i am giving random number for example))

Why above code isn't work such as this code:

import java.util.Scanner;
public class Yusuf
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Scanner text = new Scanner(System.in);
        int a,b,c;
        System.out.print("Enter first number:");
        a = text.nextInt();
        System.out.print("Enter second number:");
        b = text.nextInt();
        c = a+b;
        System.out.print("a + b = " + c);
    }
}

This code returning 40 for same numbers.. What is the difference? Absolutely i need to use different variable?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When used with strings, the + operator does string concatenation. If you add numbers to the end of a string with + the numbers will be converted to strings first.

Your statement:

System.out.print("a + b = " + a+b); 

takes the string "a + b" and concatenates the value from a as a string and then concatenates the value from b as a string.

It should work the way you want if you do this:

System.out.print("a + b = " + (a+b) );

The extra parens for (a+b) will cause that addition to be evaluated (as an int addition) before the string concatenation occurs.

share|improve this answer
    
operation priority in a sense.. –  Joseph Jan 31 '12 at 1:29
    
@Joseph - actually, this comes after normal operator priority / precedence. –  Stephen C Jan 31 '12 at 1:31
    
"Operator precedence" is the term usually used in programming. Things in parens get evaluated first, and then certain operators get evaluated before others as listed here: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/… - note that you can "nest" parentheses, e.g., (a + b) * (x / (y-6)) - the expression in the innermost parens is evaluated first... –  nnnnnn Jan 31 '12 at 1:34

+ does not always mean addition. When used with a string, it does concatenation.

When you do

System.out.print("a + b = " + a+b);

you are concatenating a and b onto the string.

In other words, you are doing

(("a + b = " + a) + b);

which evaluates to

"a + b = 15" + b

which evaluates to

"a + b = 1525"

When you do

c=a+b

and then

System.out.print("a + b = " + c);

you do the addition first, and then you concatenate the resulting value (40) onto the String.

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I need to create new variable in a sense? –  Joseph Jan 31 '12 at 1:14
1  
you need to not do string concatenation. –  hvgotcodes Jan 31 '12 at 1:15

In your first code when you say "a + b = " + a + b, you are doing a string concatenation. Whatever you add to a string will be come a string.

In your example,

first "a + b = " + a will become "a + b = 15" and then b will be contactenated.

So, it will become a + b = 1525

Where as in your second example, you are separately doing the addition and then concatenating to the string. So you are getting the desired result.

you can do "a + b = " + (a + b) aswell.

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Just do System.out.print("a + b = " + (a+b)); so that the compiler can understand that it has to first add a and b and than concatenate.

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The problem is in this line:

System.out.print("a + b = " + a+b);

The '+' operator in 'a + b' is being interpreted as a string concatenation not an integer addition.

Change it to this:

System.out.print("a + b = " + (a+b));

The reason you have to do this is a combination of the overload resolution rules for the '+' operator, and basic Java operator precedence rules.

  • If either operand of '+' is a String, then the operator is a string concatenation, and the non-String operand (if any) is converted to a String.

  • If you have x op y op z where 'op' is the same operator, then it is equivalent to (x op y) op z.


If you put that together, "a + b = " + a+b (where a and b are int) is equivalent to:

    ("a + b = " + a) + b

and hence

    "a + b = ".concat(Integer.toString(a)).concat(Integer.toString(b))

The corrected version "a + b = " + (a + b) is equivalent to:

    "a + b = ".concat(Integer.toString(a + b))
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