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Let's say I have the following class

class Parent(object):
    Options = {
        'option1': 'value1',
        'option2': 'value2'
    }

And a subclass called Child

class Child(Parent):
   Options = Parent.Options.copy()
   Options.update({
        'option2': 'value2',
        'option3': 'value3'
   })

I want to be able to override or add options in the child class. The solution I'm using works. But I'm sure there is a better way of doing it.


EDIT

I don't want to add options as class attributes because I have other class attributes that aren't options and I prefer to keep all options in one place. This is just a simple example, the actual code is more complicated than that.

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Why not ship the copy/update logic in a method of the parent class? If you put it in __init__ and always call super().__init__() at the end of subclass __init__s like you're supposed to, it should work. –  asmeurer Jun 16 '13 at 20:56

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

One way would be to use keyword arguments to dict to specify additional keys:

Parent.options = dict(
    option1='value1',
    option2='value2',
)

Child.options = dict(Parent.options,
    option2='value2a',
    option3='value3',
)

If you want to get fancier, then using the descriptor protocol you can create a proxy object that will encapsulate the lookup. (just walk the owner.__mro__ from the owner attribute to the __get__(self, instance, owner) method). Or even fancier, crossing into the probably-not-a-good-idea territory, metaclasses/class decorators.

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This will only work if your keys are all strings that are valid Python variable identifiers. –  asmeurer Jun 16 '13 at 20:54

Semantically equivalent to your code but arguably neater:

class Child(Parent):
   Options = dict(Parent.Options,
      option2='value2',
      option3='value3')

Remember, "life is better without braces", and by calling dict explicitly you can often avoid braces (and extra quotes around keys that are constant identifier-like strings).

See http://docs.python.org/library/stdtypes.html#dict for more details -- the key bit is "If a key is specified both in the positional argument and as a keyword argument, the value associated with the keyword is retained", i.e. keyword args override key-value associations in the positional arg, just like the update method lets you override them).

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After thinking more about it, and thanks to @SpliFF suggestion this is what I came up with:

class Parent(object):
    class Options:
        option1 = 'value1'
        option2 = 'value2'


class Child(Parent):
    class Options(Parent.Options):
        option2 = 'value2'
        option3 = 'value3'

I'm still open to better solutions though.

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The downside to this approach is that it's much uglier to do dynamic setting of options. For example to read the options of one class from a configuration file. –  Ants Aasma May 25 '09 at 18:31
    
Well this solution fits more in my special case. But as a general solution your solution is better. –  Nadia Alramli May 25 '09 at 19:41
    
The appropriate __getitem__/__setitem__ methods can be added later if needed. This is a good, clean solution. –  Ethan Furman Nov 4 '11 at 21:40

Why not just use class attributes?

class Parent(object):
    option1 = 'value1'
    option2 = 'value2'

class Child(Parent):
    option2 = 'value2'
    option3 = 'value3'
share|improve this answer
    
you, win. beat me by 20 seconds :) –  SpliFF May 25 '09 at 16:41
    
I prefer to keep options in one attribute as I have other class attributes that aren't options. –  Nadia Alramli May 25 '09 at 16:50
    
You can mark special attirbutes with a prefix, e.g. opt_foo and opt_bar and then access those e.g. [getattr(self, x) for x in dir(self) if x.startswith("opt_")] –  qarma Nov 5 '12 at 15:03
    
You can also list special attributes, e.g. foo=1; bar=2; _special=("foo", "bar"), some db wrappers use this approach –  qarma Nov 5 '12 at 15:06
class ParentOptions:
  option1 = 'value1'
  option2 = 'value2'

class ChildOptions(ParentOptions):
  option2 = 'value2'
  option3 = 'value3'

class Parent(object):
  options = ParentOptions()

class Child(Parent):
  options = ChildOptions()
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Hmmm, I don't know. I prefer an automated way of doing it. I have tens of subclasses. Adding a separate class for each options is going to be a mess. –  Nadia Alramli May 25 '09 at 17:03

Here is a way using a metaclass

class OptionMeta(type):
    @property
    def options(self):
        result = {}
        for d in self.__mro__[::-1]:
            result.update(getattr(d,'_options',{})) 
        return result

class Parent(object):
    __metaclass__ = OptionMeta
    _options = dict(
        option1='value1',
        option2='value2',
        )

class Child(Parent):
    _options = dict(
        option2='value2a',
        option3='value3',
        )

print Parent.options
print Child.options
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