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I just found something weird in the Python interpreter. Let me show you:

$ python
Python 2.7.1+ (r271:86832, Apr 11 2011, 18:13:53) 
[GCC 4.5.2] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> _
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name '_' is not defined
>>> 5 + 4
9
>>> _
9
>>> 'Hello world'
'Hello world'
>>> _
'Hello world'
>>> type(3.5)
<type 'float'>
>>> _
<type 'float'>

(You can try it in your interpreter, there's no tricks.)

What??? The result of last executed line is being assigned to a variable named _.

Does anybody know something about it? Is there any documentation about it? In which situation could it be useful?

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closed as not a real question by robert, jdigital, JBernardo, wim, John Machin Jan 31 '12 at 1:45

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
I thought everybody knew (and used) that... –  JBernardo Jan 31 '12 at 1:37
1  
why am I being downvoted? –  juliomalegria Jan 31 '12 at 1:38
2  
search for underscore and python at stackoverflow –  Johan Lundberg Jan 31 '12 at 1:40
2  
I think that was really unfair ... –  juliomalegria Jan 31 '12 at 1:47
1  
Well, it's not really a question. SO is a question and answer site. If you had asked "Where do I find the implementation of the feature _ in the Python interpreter?" or something similar, it might have survived. –  sarnold Jan 31 '12 at 1:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Take a look here Reserved identifiers python.

The special identifier _ is used in the interactive interpreter to store the result of the last evaluation; it is stored in the builtin module.

This behavior can be found on haskell's interactive environment ghci also. Here instead of _ use it.

Prelude> 2+2
4
Prelude> it
4
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It's useful when exploring in the interactive interpreter, when you forgot to assign a name to some returned object, you can grab a reference to it using x = _. Note that in ipython you also have __ for the second-to-last returned, and ___ is the third-to-last.

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This isn't a big secret (for example, you can find it mentioned in Code Like a Pythonista) but true, it's not well known. It could be useful when you're doing a lot of work at the command line.

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Per Underscore in Python

There are three main uses for _. One is "real" (the usage you discovered), and the other two are conventions.

Interesting... I never knew!

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__ is not only convention. docs.python.org/tutorial/classes.html#private-variables –  Johan Lundberg Jan 31 '12 at 1:43

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