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For homework, I am writing a program that deals with a lot of time_t objects. I thought about checking them for overflow, but then it occurred to me that if they overflowed we would all be in a might bit of trouble.

Is there a plan for this? What will happen when the time since epoch exceeds storage?

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I doubt there are any mainstream CRT implementations left that haven't made time_t a 64-bit type. –  Hans Passant Jan 31 '12 at 5:27
    
    
@Hans: Wrong. time_t is 32-bit (long) on all existing 32-bit machines I know of, including in particular Linux/glibc. In any case, I think it's realistic to expect all 32-bit machines will be decommissioned by 2038... –  R.. Jan 31 '12 at 5:38
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@R.: Hopefully us greybeard C programmers will be able to command outrageously high hourly rates fixing the problem in about 2036 ;) –  caf Jan 31 '12 at 9:17
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up vote 8 down vote accepted

LONG_MAX on a 64-bit machine is 2^63 - 1. Try this: go to http://google.com and enter 2^63 seconds in years. Look at the answer and decide whether you really need to worry about it.

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like like like. Yeah that's the funny thing about big number. I even thought, "oh maybe its just such a big number that we don't have to worry about it... nah 2^63 seconds is probably not THAT many years." I am satisfied with this answer. –  Ziggy Jan 31 '12 at 5:42
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I like the Wikipedia article on the issue. Using a signed 64-bit value introduces a new wraparound date at 15:30:08 on Sunday, 4 December 292,277,026,596. Will not be a problem for me at least. –  r_ahlskog Jan 31 '12 at 7:53
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Kind of makes me sad to think I may not be around to see this happen...in nearly 300 billion years from now. So puny. –  Brenden Nov 6 '12 at 4:56
    
@Brenden Not with that attitude you won't. ;^) –  rob mayoff Nov 6 '12 at 5:02
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